Oil and Gas Still Not Four Letter Words?

Brad Wall, speaking directly to oil and gas men, remarked that he thinks Ottawa needs a “champion” of non-renewable energy. There’s been more than enough support for that industry in the past decades.

This is a good sector, that oil and gas are not four letter words. That they create untold quality of life and wealth for all Canadians. Let’s make that case.

“At one point, a list of dozens of items made from derivatives of petrochemicals were highlighted on a projector screen[…]

“The smartphones they use perhaps to send you angry Tweets about your industry or send you texts,” he joked.

It’s unclear if clean water or clean air that made Wall’s speech possible had been consumed by the Premier, or if he’d denied himself these things his policies aim to end. Clearly he’d have difficulty making arguments against having these necessities, without clean air and water throughout his life.


The detractors seem to think it is impossible for Saskatchewan to go fossil fuel-free because it’s cold. Actually, Saskatchewan engineers long ago pioneered energy efficient buildings that require little to no fossil fuel heating. What’s “wacky” is that we don’t have building standards that would make conventional heating obsolete and deliver thousands in energy savings.

What Are Market Predictions?

“Mon, Aug 17, 2015 – 8:15 AM
Bill Baruch, chief market strategist, iiTrader joins BNN to discuss why he’s watching crude oil to move sharply higher today.”
“oil will rally today” is the BNN video title, but I didn’t hear the trader say that, but he did say a rally by midweek. In the video he notes $35 oil is realistic in the near term (which was actually a better prediction), and it will be unlikely to rebound to $60 if production levels stay similar to now.

Crude’s drop below $38 marks ‘epic’ time in the oil market
Published: Aug 24, 2015 11:27 a.m. ET

The MarketWatch graph shows there was no rally on the 17th, oil finished the day down.

Quite the “midweek” “rally”.

In early trade on Monday morning, the price of West Texas Intermediate was down about 5.7% and traded as low as $38.13 a barrel, a new post-financial-crisis low for the commodity that has been getting hacksawed this year.

WTI prices are down about 60% against a year ago, and after finding some stability earlier this year,

If oil gets down to below about $30, the Tarsands are no longer profitable to exploit! No wonder the Premier of Sask is shitting bricks about his bet on oil while totally neglecting renewable energy investments.

To Senate Or Not To Senate

There will be no questions. Well, almost none, as per usual.

L. Lea ‏@YukonGale :
“@althiaraj Basically he’s saying he won’t appoint any more senators but he can’t make that binding upon the next government, right?”

Not without a Constitutional amendment.

15 minutes later:

Oil Is Not A Four Letter Word

Coal is a four letter word, however.

Perhaps Wall is a bit touchy about fossil fuels because Saskatchewan produces more greenhouse gases per person than any other Canadian province [link added], and is one of only three provinces whose emissions have risen since 1990. The province contains only 1 per cent of the country’s population, but produces a disproportionate 10 per cent of national emissions.

Saskatchewan recorded the highest deposit-paid bottle return rate in Canada (82 per cent) and largest wildfire detection camera system in North America, said the ministry.

Yet we had the worst wildfire season, perhaps ever, this Summer.

Until we get on top of the big industrial emissions we are going to have great trouble achieving the targets that have been set for the province,” said Coxworth.

“We are looking to beef up that part of our portfolio – with a quarter of our power production already renewable,” said Tremblay.

The ministry on Earth Day focused on what individuals can do in their everyday lives.

{Emphasis added, to highlight that what the ministry is doing is pushing responsibility for the problem off of themselves and onto the actions of individuals who cannot individually organize us into a more efficient system.}

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Brad Wall On “Sustainably Developing Our Energy Resources”

Originally posted on John Klein - Regina:

Brad Wall says “…we need to do better in terms of more sustainably developing our energy resources…”

Unfortunately what he means is he wants to find ways of ensuring fossil fuels and uranium come out of the ground at an increasingly profitable pace, no matter the world’s demand/need for such things.
Greg Fingas views it as such, too.

He notes that oil pride goes “Before the fall”. (Although technically oil prices have already fallen.)

The government’s climate change policy works like this: extract every last drop of fossil fuel then pray to God that no one uses it.” – G. Monbiot
I’ll add that they hope no one uses it, so long as someone first buys it. Perhaps we need to consider if…

View original 520 more words

Saving Canada $90,000,000/year not worth Wall’s “effort”

“The Senate is never going to run properly and it’s never going to be worth the money we put into it. So it should be scrapped.”

Wall continues
“I’m not going to actively campaign for the Senate to be abolished.”

“even in light of this latest mess, then it’s not really worth the effort to try to change [the provinces’ {opposed to abolition}] minds.”

I don’t think Premier Wall is the sort of leader who cares to be first, to be innovative, or will stick his neck out to make important changes to save taxpaying citizens hundreds of millions of dollars over a few years.

If Wall spent just a week trying to convince other provinces to campaign to change the Constitution to reform or eliminate the Senate, I’d appreciate his effort even if it didn’t bear fruit. By not trying any harder to do something about it than the average blogger/Facebooker/Tweeter, it’s not really something someone can respect out of one of Canada’s supposed top statespersons.

I didn’t like Roy Rowmanow’s government -at all-, but I can’t imagine him backing down as quickly as Wall has in regard to Senate reform.