A gripping tale of lost Bitcoins

I’m just glad this wasn’t me. You probably won’t be disappointed reading this tale of a man losing his Bitcoin recovery information, and the low-tech, and high-tech means he tries to recover them from the ether.

Advertisements

More Vague First World Problems

I made a large purchase last week Tuesday, and have had problems paying for it. Oh, I’ve got the money, I mean I’ve had some difficulty sending it to the seller. I put a deposit down instantly over the phone by credit card, that was easy enough, but sending the bulk of the funds due has required over a week. This is in part due to the seller’s sluggishness in contacting me with payment details, and partly due to how modern banking is set up.

My smaller bank, which is actually a part of a Big 5 big Canadian bank, doesn’t have a SWIFT code to send wire transfers, so I had to select a bank draft option for $10. It was that, or wait 2-3 business days to move the money electronically to another bank, to pay them $50 to wire it. Then they couriered me the draft (couldn’t send it directly to the seller, oh no). Purolator didn’t leave a delivery notice, or a bozo stole it, or the wind blew it away, so I waited an extra day before complaining to the bank about the slow delivery. They gave me the tracking number and said it was in the city. I picked it up, and turned it around back into the system for almost $25 to be at the seller by next day.

Why not Interac email? They’ve a $3K/day limit, and the seller only wanted wired money, or a bank draft (certified cheque). Why not credit card? Something like a 2.5% merchant fee, so the seller would take a few hundred dollars hit. Why not Bitcoin? Because they’ve not set up to take it, and convert it into dollars at their end (or hold it, more sensibly). It could be a lot easier than multiple phone calls to banks, and an early morning trip to the industrial side of town where Regina doesn’t even have sidewalks or bike lanes to get there.

IT Problem At Saskatchewan Government

What’s going on?gov-sk-down

http://www.gov.sk.ca has been down a for a day.

 

The Story Of Human Voice Recordings

For the longest time, historians thought they knew Edison was the first to record the human voice. Then a team of researchers realized there were earlier recordings that were made by a Frenchman without any expectation that they could be converted back into sound. Our advanced scanning and computer equipment was able to do it with some inventive solutions, in 2008.

Learn all about an interesting aspect of our audio history, and hear sounds from the 19th Century.

Being a Cyborg Can Leave a Lot to Think About

“Today there are well over 3 million pacemakers and over 1.7 million ICD’s in use.”

What should you do to close potential cybersecurity vulnerabilities in your wireless implantable design? For one, make device security an integral, integrated component of your overall development process. Also, put a higher premium on device security testing — most importantly, penetration testing to identify weaknesses in wireless defenses — and issue remediation. Ignore cybersecurity and it will invariably come back to haunt you, whether it’s in the form of a lawsuit, a letter from the FDA, or the embarrassment (and bad press) of a hacker exposing your device’s flaws on an international stage.

I am concerned that my device doesn’t even have a password. While the threat is low, it’s not as close to zero as it should be. I don’t like being similar to the unpatched ATM at the movie theater that always has the Windows XP error dialog box on its screen. Only the absolute best computer should be installed in my chest.

http://boingboing.net/2013/10/19/dick-cheney-feared-assassinati.html
http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/20/us/dick-cheney-gupta-interview/

Other links:
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2016/04/pacemakers-and-piracy-why-dmca-has-no-business-medical-implants
http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/Safety/AlertsandNotices/ucm356423.htm
http://www.meddeviceonline.com/doc/the-shocking-truth-about-rf-implantable-devices-0001

The Most Dangerous Writing App

I tried this silly online app, and won on my first try. I chose the easiest 5 minute difficulty though.

I’m certain I won’t be able to use this dangerous writing app effectively. I should have a screenshot of it, just in case, I fail. It’s been nearly one minute, and I’ve not been interrupted, or felt I’ve had to look something up to support what I’m saying. There really is a lot of trouble in having to write without citation because I’m used to including hyperlinks, it’s what bloggers do.

The page seems to lack margins, so I am a little uncomfortable about this editor. Does copy/paste work? I’m scared to try lest I task switch to the mouse, and it assumes I’m not writing and deletes my progress. I’ve stopped watching the clock, because I have made it 2 minutes. Oops, that means I’ve peaked at the time.

The benefit of this app is no more than the one provided by Snapchat. Snapchat if you don’t know is a photo messaging app designed to delete your photo after someone has viewed it for a time length you set, up to 1 day, but more typically only a few seconds less than 10. I’ve used Snapchat for a few years now, and it’s actually pretty useful in showing people different parts of the world, thanks to its useful Story feature. Stories are automatically assembled video clips and photos you can add chronologically, and not from your phone’s Gallery.

This paragraph was the hardest to start, because I was searching for something next to type. My wrists are getting tired, as I’m racing against the clock to see how fast I can type also using the timer on this app. I’m about to be interrupted? Nope, false alarm. Whew.

That was a close one. Looks like I made it! Wow!
I win!