Twitter Suspended Victim

Some days (most days) Twitter really sucks at limiting abuse, and supporting victims of the same.

TWITTER HAS SUSPENDED ME. THERE ARE POWERFUL FORCES AT WORK. BE MY VOICE. #ROSEARMY #whywomendontreport

A post shared by Rose McGowan (@rosemcgowan) on

And closer to home, a long time blogging and Twitter friend has been in the news, but I missed it. She was sexually assaulted by another well known figure in the Saskatchewan Twitter & political sphere. She was then questioned inappropriately by Saskatoon Police about the assault.

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Conservative Party Should Be Sorry

The Conservative Party of Canada, in response to Omar Khadr being awarded a damages settlement for torturous conditions of his imprisonment, said, “No words,” on their Facebook post.

I’ve some words. A political party that was okay with leaving a child soldier to be tortured in an American prison, ought to have at least one word to say too, and that’s “sorry”.

What Omar K. was convicted for was wrong I think, but what the Canadian Liberal and Conservative governments did to him during his punishment, for being a child soldier, requires punishment for the government, for the people of Canada to allow an injustice to persist. This payout should give pause to Canadians who think there’s no repercussion for torturing a Canadian child who people hate.

Cicely Mcwilliam: Omar said for years that he didn’t throw the grenade and only relented to the states narrative so that he could be moved to a Canadian prison. He suffered torture and was denied a childhood both by his father and later by the US. That is why he both deserves an apology and compensation. [You’re] right a Liberal government and a Conservative government both failed to protect the rights of a Canadian child under the Convention on the Rights of the Child as well as the conventions related to child soldiers both of which Canada had championed.

I’m all for people fighting injustice. Conservatives and others see the injustice in a person who has [allegedly] killed someone getting more money from the government, than the victim’s family gets. I see that as an injustice. We shouldn’t fight the unjust amount going to a victim’s family, by denying the correction of another injustice, however.

Why all the Bodyslam Jokes on Twitter?

You may have heard people talking about Montanan Gianforte. He attacked a journalist.

Fox News reporter Alicia Acuna, field producer Faith Mangan and photographer Keith Railey witnessed the incident at Gianforte’s campaign headquarters in Montana, according to an account published on the Fox News website. After Jacobs asked Gianforte his question, Acuna wrote: “Gianforte grabbed Jacobs by the neck with both hands and slammed him into the ground behind him.

SaskParty Runs a Corrupt Province

Is it any wonder the Premier attends oil industry luncheons, and speaks to them as if they are his constituents for whom he is seeking the best rates?

Disturbing Police Malpractice Uncovered

Everything about this case is disturbing, most definitely the shooting death of Dunphy.

Ironically, Dunphy had invited the officer into his house. (The officer, Joe Smyth, showed up unannounced at his doorstep to assess whether he was a threat based on a tweet he had sent the premier.) Fifteen minutes later, Dunphy was dead in his easy chair.

Officer Smyth claimed that he had acted in self-defence and that Dunphy had pointed a rifle at him. After an astonishing 18-month investigation led by an officer who had on occasion worked with Smyth — an officer Smyth contacted during the investigation looking for information — the RCMP recommended no charges. Then came the public inquiry.

A Racist Killing In Progress, in Canada

A man with a group of people went looking to injure First Nations people, from their truck.

A hospital won’t put the dying woman onto organ donor lists to get replacement organs for ones damaged in the attack, because she’s had alcohol in the last half year.

Hate-crimes everywhere you look in Northern Ontario. Can something not be done besides prepare for the funeral?

 

CBC Interviewed a Gunman?

This is a wee bit outrageous.

On March 21, 1977, Robert McLagan held 11 employees at Toronto’s Banque Canadienne Nationale hostage for nearly 12 hours.

Frum and her producers were able to get McLagan, one of his hostages and a police officer on the line as the situation was unfolding — even giving CBC Radio listeners the chance to hear the beginning of a negotiation that would eventually end in a peaceful surrender.

“I’ll maybe release them a little bit later,” he says. “But I see your boys out here getting a little bit psyched up, but the front door’s unlocked and I’ve got a damned good vantage point where I can see the door and I can see the stairwell. So outside of a gung-ho charge or anything, there’s not really a hell of a lot you can do.”

The interview ends there, but according to the Toronto Star archives, the suspect eventually surrendered quietly and nobody was harmed.