Saskatchewan Royalty Is Oil?

The debate rages in Saskatchewan now about if federal money should go directly to oil companies and contractors capable of sealing defunct oil wells abandoned by irresponsible and ancient corporations. Those wells are left in the trust of our politicians, the people who tend to tell us that without oil jobs, Saskatchewan doesn’t amount to much.

Tucked away in our piggy bank is about $10 Million dollars, built up since 2007. I guess before then there was no plan to clean things up, or at least make those making the holes, pay for it. Wall’s savings are off by more than a factor of 10, because he wants over $156 Million to get the work done quickly.

Am I opposed to getting over a hundred million from the feds to clean up environmental disasters? Nope. Do I think taxpayers should bear the bulk of the burden? Heck no.

It’s clearly something oil companies both old and new should be doing for the rest of us, because of the reasons Scott lists in his video. Royalties should have been, and should now be paying for this sort of predictable mess. Budgeting of the past very clearly bequeathed this festering inheritance to us, and tough times in oil country are making it apparent just how much the Boomers and the Greatest Generation prepared for now.

Trudeau To Rush A Billion Dollars to Wall and Notley

The government is in talks to quickly allocate $1 billion for infrastructure projects in the two provinces — money earmarked by the previous government’s infrastructure fund but not yet delivered, two of the officials said.

I sincerely hope that this money goes into supporting the growing renewable energy industry, and not into propping up the fossil fuel industry instead.

Premier Wall On Prison

http://cjme.com/article/402994/inmates-refuse-food-trays-regina-correctional-centre
“IF YOU REALLY DON’T LIKE THE PRISON FOOD, THERE’S ONE WAY TO AVOID IT AND THAT IS, DON’T GO TO PRISON,” SAID PREMIER BRAD WALL.

I don’t respect that opinion, at all. I know some of you reading feel this way, but it’s wrong. Some people, even in Canada, end up in jail through no fault of their own. I can cite examples in recent years, if you are not aware.

David said: “They don’t need gourmet but they are human beings and should be given food that’s decent.”

After all, it reflects upon our society how we treat people who are now at our state’s mercy. It’s not condoning their crime if we feed them cooked eggs. It also reflects badly on the food service company Compass who happens to also provide service to the University of Regina.

Star Wars and Snow

I brushed the snow off my solar panels a couple times on the weekend, and it helped with their production a fair bit. The full sun came out, and melted the remaining flakes off too.

We watched Star Wars episode IV [8/10] and Empire Strikes Back [9/10] (Have them both on VHS), and several Star Trek The Next Generation episodes. On Friday we were at the Southland Mall to get a photo with Santa.

Another jolly bearded man at the Santa display:

My family saw the RCMP Heritage Centre for the first time. It’s priced like a tourist trap, especially compared to the admission-by-donation Royal Saskatchewan Museum. It was fun overall. Naturally my Dad and I weren’t entirely pleased with the total lack of mention about one of the first two semi-permanent NWMP presences in southern Saskatchewan, at Wood Mountain. They’ve a Sitting Bull artifact, mention Little Big Horn, and mention Walsh, but I don’t think you could find the words “Wood Mountain” if you tried. That’s a shame. It was the site of one of Canada’s first successful peace keeping missions, assigned to Walsh of the NWMP.

Sitting Bull

 

Is #COP21 #ParisAgreement a Great Advance, or a Huge Flop?

We’ll know, I think, by 2025 when it’s too late to do anything about the past 10 years.
I’m cautiously optimistic that it’s an agreement that will provide a better push than Kyoto or Copenhagen ever had a chance to do.
It’s probably aiming somewhere beneath a complete success (which we obviously need to preserve civilization and species at risk of extinction), and above the total failure to move lagging countries like Canada and India off their fossil fueled paths.

Saskatchewan is showing signs of improvement, with even conservative (Conservative leader hopeful?) Brad Wall loosening the chains on progress toward renewable energy. But expect the Premier to re-pitch nuclear power.

American cities are showing bolder targets. 100% is Possible. Saskatchewan should have a plan this bold too [PDF].
Continue reading

Two Different Takes On Gas Prices

You can either lose your mind and your perspective:

It’s not your imagination — gasoline prices in Canada should be a lot lower than they are right now.

That’s according to Benjamin Reitzes, an economist at Bank of Montreal, who said the price Canadians pay at the pump should be a lot lower than it currently is based on the plunging price of a barrel of crude.

Or you can cool your jets and the overheating planet.

The latest round of interest in prices at the pump originated with some analysis yesterday from Bank of Montreal senior economist Benjamin Reitzes. While standing by the gas pumps this past weekend, Reitzes got to thinking. And so he ran the numbers and produced an eloquent graph.

“Simply,” concludes Reitzes, “consumers don’t appear to be reaping the full benefit of lower oil prices.”

Cue outrage in the comments section. Though, amusingly, some turned on the whistleblower, asking why the report didn’t do a similar job on bank fees.

“Certainly I, too, am unreasonably enticed by low pump prices.”
Ditto.
So, why do people who know better have brains that work this way?

“Disproportionate obsession”

“For the several minutes that I stand at the pump, all I do is stare at the growing total on the meter — there is nothing else to do,” wrote Ariely in Psychology Today in 2008. Watching the tank fill was an up-close-and-personal experience. It was repeated daily or weekly. It gave him a false sense of its importance to his life.