Wall’s Faulty Logic

“Showing leadership matters, signals matter, examples matter, but the numbers are the numbers,” Wall said.

Essentially, Wall appears to be suggesting that because no single action by itself will solve the problem, we shouldn’t take that single action.

Applying this logic to other situations reveals just how faulty it is.

When China surpasses the amount & proportion of green electricity generation of Saskatchewan, who’re we going to use as scapegoat for lagging?

Laying Down A Deadly Bluff

For ages now Canadians have been conditioned to accept that we “need” more pipelines to move more oil. Otherwise we’ll continue to exhaust train crews and have bombtrains in every town.

Now it slips out that the plan is for oil to grow even though we need to #LeaveItInTheGround to have a chance at not exceeding our atmosphere’s “carbon budget” which determines if climate change causes mass flooding and extinctions. This will happen during our lifetimes, if we don’t build the alternative transportation systems now.

Where’s Wall’s Western Strategy Now?

It wasn’t very long ago that Brad Wall was a part of shaping western Canada. He wanted BC, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and maybe even Manitoba to agree on LCD wage and labour codes, so we could more easily trade workers around. Now that he’s surrounded by NDP provinces, he’s not involved?

http://calgaryherald.com/business/energy/alberta-manitoba-to-co-operate-on-energy-efficiency-and-climate-change

We’ve got SaskPower supposedly committed to reducing fossil fuel electricity to 50% in less than 15 years, but looking to rebuild coal plants that will strand billions in assets well into the next generation!

SaskPower has recommitted to coal, signing two contracts with Westmoreland Coal to supply 60 million tonnes from its Estevan mine to 2024 and 58 million tonnes from its Poplar River mine to 2029. Doesn’t this suggest SaskPower effectively has decided to build two more carbon capture and storage facilities at its Boundary Dam Power Station?

“it seem that a decision has been made all but officially to convert the pre-1975 units to CCS by 2020.”

Meanwhile, Brett Dolter has done an economic analysis of Saskatchewan’s electricity generation options, and one of those is to partner with Manitoba to build hydro capacity we can use.

Is #COP21 #ParisAgreement a Great Advance, or a Huge Flop?

We’ll know, I think, by 2025 when it’s too late to do anything about the past 10 years.
I’m cautiously optimistic that it’s an agreement that will provide a better push than Kyoto or Copenhagen ever had a chance to do.
It’s probably aiming somewhere beneath a complete success (which we obviously need to preserve civilization and species at risk of extinction), and above the total failure to move lagging countries like Canada and India off their fossil fueled paths.

Saskatchewan is showing signs of improvement, with even conservative (Conservative leader hopeful?) Brad Wall loosening the chains on progress toward renewable energy. But expect the Premier to re-pitch nuclear power.

American cities are showing bolder targets. 100% is Possible. Saskatchewan should have a plan this bold too [PDF].
Continue reading

Two Different Takes On Gas Prices

You can either lose your mind and your perspective:

It’s not your imagination — gasoline prices in Canada should be a lot lower than they are right now.

That’s according to Benjamin Reitzes, an economist at Bank of Montreal, who said the price Canadians pay at the pump should be a lot lower than it currently is based on the plunging price of a barrel of crude.

Or you can cool your jets and the overheating planet.

The latest round of interest in prices at the pump originated with some analysis yesterday from Bank of Montreal senior economist Benjamin Reitzes. While standing by the gas pumps this past weekend, Reitzes got to thinking. And so he ran the numbers and produced an eloquent graph.

“Simply,” concludes Reitzes, “consumers don’t appear to be reaping the full benefit of lower oil prices.”

Cue outrage in the comments section. Though, amusingly, some turned on the whistleblower, asking why the report didn’t do a similar job on bank fees.

“Certainly I, too, am unreasonably enticed by low pump prices.”
Ditto.
So, why do people who know better have brains that work this way?

“Disproportionate obsession”

“For the several minutes that I stand at the pump, all I do is stare at the growing total on the meter — there is nothing else to do,” wrote Ariely in Psychology Today in 2008. Watching the tank fill was an up-close-and-personal experience. It was repeated daily or weekly. It gave him a false sense of its importance to his life.

Former Journo and Former Minister, For Good Reasons

One of my fondest memories in politics is when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called Peter Kent a POS in the House of Commons.

Can Postmedia Be Trusted?

Newspapers have a duty to publish public concerns. However such concerns, when unsubstantiated, poorly researched and ill-expressed should be confined to the letters page.

The editorial boards of both the Star Phoenix and Leader Post have made it abundantly clear that they support coal with carbon capture. However that ship has sailed and renewables now represents a $5-
billion industry that could generate thousands of jobs across Saskatchewan. Isn’t it about time for our Province’s two largest newspapers to get on board with this new reality?

The Leader Post’s legacy assets like Mandryk and Johnstone have fondness for Wall’s Carbon Capture and Storage boondoggle, and a distaste for those speaking out against it like David Suzuki. What shows up in the paper today, after the dreadful anti-wind op-ed yesterday?
Boundary Dam carbon capture project is better than many think” -Frank Proto

If it weren’t for Greg Fingas appearing in the columns section, the LP would be a near total wasteland when it comes to critical thought and expression.