Creating a Mob May Be Easy

…But controlling a mob isn’t something you can really predict.

What’s the Saskatchewan Premier doing releasing an open letter to the Prime Minister calling for a “pause” and “delay” to refugee settlement? He’s equating terrorism in France with Syrian refugees on their way to live in Saskatchewan. That’s a terrible, and Islamophobic position to take.

The Premier emboldened people to take out anger for the Paris Attacks against innocent Muslim people.

And talk radio’s Conservative stalwart Gormley tweeted that chanting Muslims in North America should be shot. He retracted and apologized for the ridiculously violent comment that encouraged a mob to “shoot” Muslims.

Maybe whipping up this Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt, won’t play in their favour this time?
A petition is circulating to remove Gormley from the air. I think he should just give up his newspaper column, since he’s obviously too volatile to be writing for a provincial newspaper.
Continue reading

Too Fast To Be Absorbed

The scandalous details are piling up too quickly to take in. Or, did my blog post title mean that the CO2 is being injected too quickly to be sequestered? We may never know.

Aquistore will permanently sequester only 350,000 tonnes, or 1.2%, of the of 30-million tonnes which will be captured at BD3.

Of the rest going toward “Enhanced Oil Recovery” (basically replacing oil with CO2 liquid pushed underground), only some of that remains sequestered underground. So even if the BD3 plant attains its still out-of-reach 90% capture rate, that doesn’t accurately reflect the amount of CO2 prevented from entering the atmosphere. It’s somewhere far south of the 50% figure, making clean coal half clean, and half deadly, depending on how you want to view that filthy cup.

It’s a Gas

CCS, what is it good for? Absolutely money. Not for you and I, no, it’s good for oil companies.

We’re talking about this because the only “clean coal” plant isn’t working properly yet, and it opened over a year ago (late). The delay is costing SaskPower customers tens of millions of dollars in penalties to pay to the oil company Cenovus.

SaskWind explains:

350,000 tonnes will be permanently sequestered in Aquistore
Aquistore’s own web site describes itself as a “storage site for the world’s first commercial post-combustion CO2 capture, transportation, utilization, and storage project from a coal-fired electrical generating station”. However SaskPower, in its ‘Case for Carbon Capture and Storage’ confirms that Aquistore will permanently sequester only 350,000 tonnes, or 1.2%, of the of 30-million tonnes which will be captured at BD3. This small amount confirms that BD3 was only ever about providing CO2 for Enhanced Oil Recovery. In other words: the tiny percentage that is permanently sequestered at Aquistore is simply a fig leaf to disguise the true nature of BD3 – the production, at public expense, of CO2 for the oil industry.

-emphasis added

I’ve been writing about the true purpose of CCS for years and years. Others have realized it too.

We’ve roughly months left in the world to stop building coal fired electricty infrastructure, without certainly stranding those assets when we have to dismantle them in coming years before the plants recoup their investments.

Continue reading

Touted CCS Technology Not Working As Boasted About

SNC-Lavalin-built carbon capture facility has ‘serious design issues’: SaskPower
Despite conflicts, SaskPower gives SNC another multi-million dollar contract

Mind you, the fact there’s legal action in the cards hasn’t stopped SaskPower from awarding the firm a $4 million portion of the $45-million Island Falls Powerhouse Concrete Rehabilitation project.

Nor did a September 2014 SaskPower carbon capture briefing note, obtained by the NDP, which says SNC “is more concerned about getting paid for the 6.5 million than fixing the deficiencies of our plant.”

It goes on to note “very poor to no support from SNC Lavalin,” and “serious design deficiencies” in the project.

SaskPower CEO Mike Marsh says “because there’s a contract dispute (with SNC) on one job, doesn’t mean we don’t use them on another job.”

I happen to work at the same university, the one primarily responsible for research that made Boundary Dam CCS possible:

Associate professor of marketing at the University of Regina, Lisa Watson, says “of course people are going to be upset” over the issues at Boundary Dam.

The bigger question, she says, is whether they should be.

The consumer push for more environmentally sustainable options and clean energy is a “major change” for government, she says, and perhaps people shouldn’t be upset when projects involving groundbreaking technology don’t go as planned.

Carbon capture has “huge potential, and if it was working properly, we’d be shouting from the rooftops,” she says, and “to not do it at all, I don’t think that’s the right thing.”

Premier Brad Wall touts Sask. carbon sequestration project
Some premiers are sitting out today’s climate change summit in Quebec City, but Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall is there, talking up the province’s efforts to capture and store carbon dioxide.
Wall told an audience that the world needs to follow Saskatchewan’s example if there are to be serious reductions in greenhouse emissions.

I tried to find Brad Wall on a rooftop shouting to people about it, instead there is video of him on Sun News TV boasting about it to Brian Lilley, and more than a smattering of articles on the Web boasting about it.
“YouTube’s great, you can learn anything on YouTube.” – Premier Wall

Wall at Boundary Dam CCS

Boyd admits issues surrounding the plant have “a bit of a negative connotation,” adding “I think any time there’s losses, any time there’s problems, there’s certainly a degree of loss of confidence.”
On the other hand, he thinks taxpayers “would rather have SaskPower delivering power to them,” rather than the private power companies that operate in other jurisdictions.

Wow, neat way for Boyd to suggest the alternative to fixing SaskPower is only to ditch the Crown Corp and go with a rob-you-blind private power corporation instead. (The Saskatchewan Green Party is proposing converting SaskPower into a Crown Co-op instead.)

An aware commenter notes:

Myek O’Shea:

Holy spinning neckties Batman! Our loss of confidence is with Bill Boyd and those politicians that chose carbon sequestration over renewable energies. The Sask Party keeps green washing this sequestration turd as if we asked for it in the first place. Want to restore our confidence? Lets go 40% wind and solar by 2020. But on the other hand, maybe tax payers should waste their money on subsidizing the petroleum oligarchy. Oh and ‘groundbreaking’ here is a pun, nothing more.

There’s also the huge matter of SNC-Lavalin’s criminal charges. The Federal government stopped dealing with HP after a bribery conviction for that company.

More from Global News Regina.
“SaskPower says the project is now on target to be fully operational by the end of 2016.”

“Out of the more than 250 companies year to date on the World Bank’s running list of firms blacklisted from bidding on its global projects under its fraud and corruption policy, 117 are from Canada — with SNC-Lavalin and its affiliates representing 115 of those entries, the World Bank said. “

Oil and Gas Still Not Four Letter Words?

Brad Wall, speaking directly to oil and gas men, remarked that he thinks Ottawa needs a “champion” of non-renewable energy. There’s been more than enough support for that industry in the past decades.

This is a good sector, that oil and gas are not four letter words. That they create untold quality of life and wealth for all Canadians. Let’s make that case.

“At one point, a list of dozens of items made from derivatives of petrochemicals were highlighted on a projector screen[…]

“The smartphones they use perhaps to send you angry Tweets about your industry or send you texts,” he joked.

It’s unclear if clean water or clean air that made Wall’s speech possible had been consumed by the Premier, or if he’d denied himself these things his policies aim to end. Clearly he’d have difficulty making arguments against having these necessities, without clean air and water throughout his life.


The detractors seem to think it is impossible for Saskatchewan to go fossil fuel-free because it’s cold. Actually, Saskatchewan engineers long ago pioneered energy efficient buildings that require little to no fossil fuel heating. What’s “wacky” is that we don’t have building standards that would make conventional heating obsolete and deliver thousands in energy savings.

Oil Is Not A Four Letter Word

Coal is a four letter word, however.

Perhaps Wall is a bit touchy about fossil fuels because Saskatchewan produces more greenhouse gases per person than any other Canadian province [link added], and is one of only three provinces whose emissions have risen since 1990. The province contains only 1 per cent of the country’s population, but produces a disproportionate 10 per cent of national emissions.

Saskatchewan recorded the highest deposit-paid bottle return rate in Canada (82 per cent) and largest wildfire detection camera system in North America, said the ministry.

Yet we had the worst wildfire season, perhaps ever, this Summer.

Until we get on top of the big industrial emissions we are going to have great trouble achieving the targets that have been set for the province,” said Coxworth.

“We are looking to beef up that part of our portfolio – with a quarter of our power production already renewable,” said Tremblay.

The ministry on Earth Day focused on what individuals can do in their everyday lives.

{Emphasis added, to highlight that what the ministry is doing is pushing responsibility for the problem off of themselves and onto the actions of individuals who cannot individually organize us into a more efficient system.}

Continue reading

Brad Wall On “Sustainably Developing Our Energy Resources”

Originally posted on John Klein - Regina:

Brad Wall says “…we need to do better in terms of more sustainably developing our energy resources…”

Unfortunately what he means is he wants to find ways of ensuring fossil fuels and uranium come out of the ground at an increasingly profitable pace, no matter the world’s demand/need for such things.
Greg Fingas views it as such, too.

He notes that oil pride goes “Before the fall”. (Although technically oil prices have already fallen.)

The government’s climate change policy works like this: extract every last drop of fossil fuel then pray to God that no one uses it.” – G. Monbiot
I’ll add that they hope no one uses it, so long as someone first buys it. Perhaps we need to consider if…

View original 520 more words