This Morning In Police Shootings…

#ERRE Electoral Reform Committee in Regina

ERRE

First Expert guests I watched presenting to the committee were unable to understand French question fired at them because they were not equipped with translation headphones. Nathan Cullen leaped up and got the headsets for them.

Me and MP Nathan Cullen in Regina after #ERRE committee meeting open mic I spoke at.

CLC points out they are a political org and that is why they are interested in this subject of electoral reform.

Now May is questioning Prof. Jim Harding. Interesting there are few environmentalists who’ve presented to this committee thus far, she notes. Is there a connection between FPTP and lackluster environmental protections.

Justice is at the centre of principles for this committee, he says. Beauty is also central to all societies, including environmental beauty. We have local representatives, but they presently have to bow to some special interests over the collective wishes of their constituents.

Ruby S. with a question to CLC now. Union polls, etc. Not keeping my interest.

Also I’m thinking about what I will say. I don’t want FPTP, and want the PM to keep his promise that last election was the last time.

I’m the youngest person in the gallery of observers, only a woman behind me is the same generation. About 35 here to watch or speak. Maybe some will come tonight to speak? I doubt it. I feel compelled to mention it and ask that whatever system change is made the committee also change voting age down to 15 or 16 to create interest in our politics among young people.

If they don’t grow up voting they are less likely to care. They grow up disenfranchised teenagers able to drive and participate in society in most ways except choosing our lawmakers.

I told story of time I voted at University versus at parent’s riding, thus triggering a tie vote in that other riding.

Dave Orban speaking on behalf of non human organisms. Humans could be voted off the planet. MMP favoured by his constituents.

First woman at open mic. is a PR supporter. Doesn’t like strategic voting. Global warming is most urgent issue of our time. Earth cannot last another Harper style government.

“We’ve become a backwater.” In how we don’t have PR, what stable countries tend to use.

Next woman said other presentations were great and committee is on an adventure meeting Canadians.

Next man wants a referendum and “didn’t vote for this government”. Wants them to take their time.

Voted for 20 years and never been represented by her choice. She is a parent of teenagers “I’m used to not being listened to.” “FPTP is undermining Rule of Law”.
People may feel they shouldn’t follow the law if they don’t have a say in how laws are made. People will stand in front of bulldozers to stop pipelines and not pay taxes and that’s a problem.
-Really good presentation by Patricia Farnese

Jane had a good presentation too.

Next guy wants a referendum. Doesn’t trust Liberals to get it right. Concerned extreme parties could elect MPs.

May thanks crowd after.
Me and Elizabeth May in Regina after #ERRE.

Even When It Tries To Be Good, It’s Not

The Mainstream Media, or MSM, has failed the people. Maybe because the majority is not owned by the people, but by large debt holders, billionaires, and the government. Their attempt to be “fair”, still overlook elephants in the room.

Yes, the American MSM is failing in their efforts to be fair to Trump. They rarely call his positions “lies”, or “racist”, and continue to give him excessive screen time when he’s clearly manipulating the media to manipulate the public in his favour. The only time the MSM will talk about the Green and Libertarian Party candidates, is when something goes wrong in their campaigns.

Canada’s foremost news anchor has been paid by Big Oil to speak to them in person. Why bother, when he can do so every weeknight on the taxpayer’s dime?

Fortunately, there are exceptions in Canadian media, but not it seems at the largest media creators:

Canadian Debt

Jeremy Harrison, minister of the economy pointed to the fact the average Canadian family needs 42.8 per cent of its pre-tax income for housing while the average in Saskatchewan is 28.6 per cent.

“So I think that speaks as to the affordability of living here in this province,” said Harrison.

John Hopkins, CEO of the Regina and District Chamber of Commerce, said the survey indicates that Canadians are spending heavily on necessities like housing.

That’s created concern there could be real trouble for consumers if there’s a sudden increase in interest rates, but “we’re not seeing that anywhere on the horizon, thank goodness,” he said

Harrison’s comment could be very funny if the housing market crashes next year, and Hopkins’ too if interest rates go to 5%.

Murder for $10,000

“How does a person charged with murder get bail for $10,000?”

There are some people in Saskatchewan who think* like this:

“In my mind his only mistake was leaving witnesses,” is one troubling post that appeared online.

*Racism is not thinking, it’s a feeling like fear and anger.

Here’s another theory about the bail.

The weekend wasn’t all negative though.

B-17 Flying Fortress over Regina

Regina was lucky to get a visit from the famous World War II bomber plane.

I spent a few days running outside in the morning when I heard it roaring overhead, and snapping some photos and shooting videos. My older SD video camera has a much better 12X real zoom (48X digital), but my phone has HD video and less decent 4X digital zoom.
B-17

B-17 Flying Fortress

B-17 Flying Fortress

B-17 Flying Fortress

B-17 Flying Fortress

Wood Mountain: Population 21

When I was ten, my family picked up an exchange student from the Regina airport. It was Winter. As the South American boy rode with me on the van bench, across an open prairie between Regina and Moose Jaw, he asked how many people lived in Wood Mountain. I replied proudly, “Forty people live in Wood Mountain.” I knew, because I could count every one by going through each home in my mind, up and down the three streets, and three avenues. “Forty thousand?” he prompted for more details. “No, forty people.”

The school closed about three years later. The second last elevator burned in 1997 due to lightning strikes. The last wooden elevator in the village was demolished in 2014. There’s still a Community Hall, a rural post office and RM/Village office, a fire hall, a church, and Department of Highways buildings, and there are 21 people who live right in the village. More than a few live on the farms and ranches nearby. It’s still a community, and it still matters. Now, it’s Population 21.

It’s not even the second time Wood Mountain has been featured in a National Film Board documentary, but it is the first with my parents.