Trudeau Man, I, Ahh… I Don’t Know

Canadians were so eager to get rid of Stephen Harper, they forgot they weren’t served very well by a mainstream party holding a majority on power the last 4 years.

*uncharacteristically crumples plan paper up into a ball and throws it in the garbage*
Me yesterday:

October 19, 2015 at 1:35 PM:

The alternate universe of sensible adults and fair outcomes would include a minority Parliament with Trudeau, Mulcair, and May all sharing the role of PM at different times over the next 4 years. But, we won’t get such an outcome, and are more likely to get [a Liberal minority without Harper in opposition].
If a Liberal majority, then status quo in a lot of ways for the next 4-5 years.

There’s too much change across the country to digest in one blog post about it all. I’m more optimistic about the future than in 2006 when Harper won, but I also have 9 years of experience, and the world has another decade lacking significant action to turn away from civilization destroying air pollution, and deforestation.

What is Trudeau going to do to inspire real changes? His advisers I don’t have much confidence in, sorry, I don’t. I hope he breaks party lines and appoints a few NDP MPs, and Elizabeth May to his cabinet, but that’s too much to hope for.

CBC Wrecks Another Debate #elxn42

I’ve long called for More Debates, Not Fewer Debaters, and CBC again disappoints.

My Feb. prediction, sadly is coming true.

The unethical fools at the Broadcast Consortium will probably gladly keep Elizabeth May away from the debates this year too.


Glop And Pail Leaves Greens Out of Debate

The Globe and Mail, Google Canada, and Munk Debates all ought to be ashamed of their brands.

In both cases, the organizers say they chose to invite leaders whose parties have official status in the House of Commons, which requires at least 12 seats. The Green party, Bloc Quebecois and Forces et Democratie each have two seats.

So, rather than doing the common sense thing, and inviting all of the parties in the House to participate (more debate is good in a democracy), they do the convenient and wrong thing instead and exclude the Greens in a faux attempt to be “fair and balanced” since they’ve no desire to see F&D no the Bloc on TV at all. Clearly, they’ve no respect for Elizabeth May or the millions of Canadians who’ve considered voting Green.

The Globe has no intention of allowing a party outside of Ottawa/Toronto’s comfortable power structure. They’ll have a harder time grabbing sound bites to rebroadcast later if they have more participants. It’s scandalous that a major newspaper would harm their journalistic integrity so badly, that TVO trumps them when it comes to principles. Heck, CBC, CTV, and Global are more ethical than the Globe, and that’s surprising (since they at least are allowing the Greens equal air time).

Google shouldn’t be evil.

I barely know of the Munk Debates, but I know I’ll never promote or watch one of their broadcasts again if they continue down this anti-democratic path. It’s ironic they’ve “debates” in their organization’s name, since they do debates so pathetically.

Royal Sask Museum

Just Not Ready To Debate


Also, Goodbye Peter MacKay:

Good news everyone! Peter MacKay or Conservative polling indicated that MacKay wouldn’t have held his seat! And/Or he’s got a cushy private job lined up with a bank.

And I wish Peter MacKay the success Jim Prentice enjoyed after leaving the effing Federal Cabinet.

Marco thinks MacKay will run for Conservative leader when Harper leaves after the election. We’ll see, I guess.

Conservatives Take Their Debate Ball and Hide In A Closet

After so much effort from the Greens to ensure all Canadians can hear an inclusive debate, what the Conservatives are doing now is absurd and frustrating. So the Cons are behaving typically. Will the media let them get off? Yes, history shows.

Of course, the less the Prime Minister says, the less he gets in trouble.

By doing this, the Prime Minister’s Office is sending a clear signal to legacy media platforms that their old way of doing debates is done. By proactively taking that initiative, it looks like Team Harper is attuned to the times – and voter interests.

-JAIME WATT of Navigator (Firm that dropped Jian Ghomeshi)

Why voters would be interested in the Prime Minister dictating what sort of debates there will be for him to participate in, is beyond me.

Why endure the whole thing when you can catch a recap of the highlights by waiting a short period of time?

Because people don’t speak in sound bites except on Twitter, Mr. Watt. Real life happens first, and media cuts down what’s real into what is presentable for those short periods of time they ironically call “news”.

Oh My

Monday morning CBC news with David Common led with the story of Elizabeth May’s failed PPG skit on Saturday. How’s that for perspective? These are the people who until last month had been considering not even letting the Green Party leader speak at the televised leaders’ debates, and now she’s a top story two days after a gaffe.

May told Hiscox that she was attempting to play off her image as a “goody-goody two shoes” in Parliament.

“I never heckle, I never swear, I’m respectful to everyone, so I’d gotten the idea that as skit material, it would be be funny if I were different from how I actually am,” she said.

“That obviously doesn’t work… especially in a clip out of context from the whole event.”

“So, @ElizabethMay’s thing wasn’t funny and was likely, er, over-refreshed. But the top news story everywhere? Seriously?”

“I was trying — and obviously failing, badly — at delivering something a bit edgy, and in hindsight, should have realized that I had travelled so much in the previous 48 hours that I was probably too sleep deprived to pull it off properly.”

“Ironically, sleep deprivation was also the reason Khadr agreed to a plea deal…”

Opposed to Coalition?

Yesterday’s news:

Today’s news:
Most Canadians are opposed to a coalition government. Presently the only party with the word “coalition” in its founding documents is the Conservative Party of Canada, and yes it’s true as Trudeau said today, that most Canadians are opposed to the Conservative government.

The problem is, if you have a real conversation with Canadians, you’ll learn they aren’t really opposed to a coalition government, they are just afraid of political instability they’ve associated with coalition and proportional representation electoral systems. They’ll unfailingly mutter about Italy having so many elections, and overlook the countries with proportional systems that are not unstable, and have better social programs and democratic participation than Canada manages.

Tomorrow’s news: