Being a Cyborg Can Leave a Lot to Think About

“Today there are well over 3 million pacemakers and over 1.7 million ICD’s in use.”

What should you do to close potential cybersecurity vulnerabilities in your wireless implantable design? For one, make device security an integral, integrated component of your overall development process. Also, put a higher premium on device security testing — most importantly, penetration testing to identify weaknesses in wireless defenses — and issue remediation. Ignore cybersecurity and it will invariably come back to haunt you, whether it’s in the form of a lawsuit, a letter from the FDA, or the embarrassment (and bad press) of a hacker exposing your device’s flaws on an international stage.

I am concerned that my device doesn’t even have a password. While the threat is low, it’s not as close to zero as it should be. I don’t like being similar to the unpatched ATM at the movie theater that always has the Windows XP error dialog box on its screen. Only the absolute best computer should be installed in my chest.

http://boingboing.net/2013/10/19/dick-cheney-feared-assassinati.html
http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/20/us/dick-cheney-gupta-interview/

Other links:
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2016/04/pacemakers-and-piracy-why-dmca-has-no-business-medical-implants
http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/Safety/AlertsandNotices/ucm356423.htm
http://www.meddeviceonline.com/doc/the-shocking-truth-about-rf-implantable-devices-0001

Brad Wall Makes News Again

That was following this tragedy highlighted in the world media.

Wall’s latest ploy was rejected
When voters duly selected
A government who
Promised to unscrew
All that Harper effected.

Too Fast To Be Absorbed

The scandalous details are piling up too quickly to take in. Or, did my blog post title mean that the CO2 is being injected too quickly to be sequestered? We may never know.

Aquistore will permanently sequester only 350,000 tonnes, or 1.2%, of the of 30-million tonnes which will be captured at BD3.

Of the rest going toward “Enhanced Oil Recovery” (basically replacing oil with CO2 liquid pushed underground), only some of that remains sequestered underground. So even if the BD3 plant attains its still out-of-reach 90% capture rate, that doesn’t accurately reflect the amount of CO2 prevented from entering the atmosphere. It’s somewhere far south of the 50% figure, making clean coal half clean, and half deadly, depending on how you want to view that filthy cup.

Dead Boy In The Sea

Wednesday’s Twitter feeds were jammed with the body of a young corpse of a boy facing down in the sand as an authority stood over the body and soon picked him up to carry his body away. I realized the boy was from a refugee family that didn’t make a boat crossing. He was a Syrian attempting to leave Turkey. His family had sought refuge in Canada. Regrettably, the Canadian Government did not make it possible, and the family fled Turkey by boat and most of them died.

Killer Robots By Accident or On Purpose?

There are companies like Lockheed Martin making autonomous killing robots, and there are companies like Google making self-driving cars (which kill people by accident or poor design). At least cars don’t tend to kill on purpose, and the Google self-driving car hasn’t had a deadly accident (or one it caused, of any kind). So, what’s worse? Intentionally creating machines that can destroy humans, or accidentally doing it? Let’s aim at neither.

Many people have seen the Sci-Fi movie Terminator and Terminator 2. They were made before the WWW, and before Skynet seemed like a possibility. Now we have 3D printers, we have walking and flying robots who can shoot, and we have a global intelligence network those machines connect directly to. We need to be very cautious in Artificial Intelligence development over the coming years, or a small group of people could make a mistake that could cost millions (billions?) of lives.

With Millions To Spare, Here’s How to Save Thousands of Lives

This rich couple is doing good with their money.

Regina caught sight of a jacket in the water during the cruise, and when she asked about it, she was told it might belong to a dead migrant who was trying to find safety in Europe.

While some Europeans criticize the rescue operation, saying it draws more migrants to the sea, Xuereb says that’s just not true. People are desperate, undertaking the journey to find a better life. They deserve to live, he says.

Last year, about 218,000 people made this journey — a record. Some 3,500 people drowned. And the numbers are growing.