Minister of SaskPower, Duncan, Should Resign

I don’t think I’ve ever called for a Minister to resign before, while on the radio, but Duncan should definitely quit screwing up Saskatchewan, SaskPower, and our environment.

SaskPower Cancels Solar Power in Saskatchewan

SaskPower has yet to build a mere Megawatt of solarpower, but has now canceled the ability of solar installers to accept new work in the province. They went way farther than the cancellation of the rebate I warned readers about back in June. The Net Metering program has allowed hundreds of people to add more renewable solar power to our grid than the inept, anti-solar Crown Corporation ever has.

Not to brag, but I produce more solar power than SaskPower. I also out-produce the City of Regina after they’ve been studying the idea of producing solar power for over 2 years. I make more electricity from the sun than the climate-denying Government of Saskatchewan does on its  buildings in the capital city of Regina. Regina, by the way, ranks in the top 10 cities in the world for solar power potential. And I make more than Ralph Goodale and Catherine McKenna’s green-friendly Liberal Government of Canada does on its buildings in Regina too. In short, they all suck, and I don’t suck as much.

People who shouldn’t be making the big decisions, are. The people need to stop electing boneheads who couldn’t pass a Grade 10 science class to save their lives. It would help if we’d make it illegal for elected parties to take money from oil companies too.

Speak up and let your neighbour, or friend, or co-worker know that you’re aware they don’t want to hear your political opinion, but you’re scared if things devolve any further you’ll have beef force fed to you by roving gangs of insane cattle ranchers dressed all in Green and White soon.

“I cannot wrap my head around this.” – Young

When a political decision makes no sense, like shutting down solar in Saskatchewan, you can assume it’s either due to incompetence, or due to corruption. And we’ve already confirmed that political parties take money from oil companies in Saskatchewan, and  oppose sensible actions to combat the climate crisis.

SaskPower Cutting Solar Funding Instead of Cheques

Despite a ticking clock to cut emissions drastically, SaskPower is opting to continue to burn low grade coal instead of support faster adoption of solar power. They’re cutting a successful Net Metering rebate system 2 years early.

There’s a promise by the wildly anti-environment SaskParty, even during Brad Wall’s years, to cut power generation back to only 50% fossil fueled, by 2030. It makes zero sense for SaskPower to remove an incentive for its customers to help it reach that objective earlier.
UPDATE: It’s even worse than the incentive going away, all new applications for solar and wind isn’t being accepted now!

Civic Hatchback vs. LEAF Hatchback

Should you buy a Honda gas burner, or a pure electric Nissan if you need a family hatchback motor vehicle?

“2019 Civic hatchback and coupe models are priced […] at $20,150US and $19,350US, respectively. The base trim includes features like a rearview camera, Bluetooth, a 5-inch display screen, and a USB port.”

Currency exchange is about 1.34 to CAD right now, so that’s 20150*1.34 = $27000$26,265 (price updated Apr 27, 2019)

My used Nissan LEAF 2014 (bought 2 years ago), with the same technology features listed above plus rear heated seats, and heated steering wheel (handy in Winter): $15,500. At my old place, I had 8 solar panels which cost $8400 installed. Together that’s $23,900.

Now, I’m no financial genius, but a solar powered hatchback that costs $2365 less than a new gas burning hatchback, seems like a better idea.

Doubting sorts might question, can a $8400, 2kW solar array really power a Nissan LEAF. That’s a great question! The answer is complicated. The short answer is yes.

Using a Bluetooth OBDII car-computer reading gizmo to read the LEAF’s battery status with my phone and the app Leaf Spy Lite, it reveals the car’s battery has 20kWh of capacity, down from its brand new 24kWh selling point.

Using the Solar Edge website, I was able to determine that my array in March would typically produce more than 10kWh per day. That electricity is instantly used in the house, the EV if plugged in to charge, and the excess goes into the grid. The power company, SaskPower, provides a credit 1-for-1 for the electricity provided vs. taken from their grid in a set year. This is known as Net Metering.

(UPDATE Oct. 2019: The backwards Sask Party has ended Net Metering in Saskatchewan, there’s now a 0.5-for-1 credit instead. It may still be economical to get solar to offset an EV use,  but rerun your calculations.)

My household tends to charge the LEAF to 100% overnight on the regular wall plug (slow Level 1 charging this is called), and use it to about 50% capacity during the following day. That means it needs ~10kWh put back into it at night.  Astute readers will note that’s about how much power the panels are producing.

The LEAF doesn’t need gasoline, or oil changes. You can “fill” it at home on a regular wall plug. Why are people still buying new Civics? If they routinely travel more than 100km in the city in a day, or 70km at top highway speeds, the Civic might be more appealing, but it’s obviously more expensive and harder on your lungs and our planet’s creatures.

Now, if you want to save even more money, and more creatures, I have another tip for you:

SaskPower Is Going To Miss Target

March 16, 2017
Dear Editor,
People should be asking how SaskPower intends to meet the 50% renewable electricity by 2030 target set by the Premier over a year ago. Since that announcement, a 350 MegaWatt (MW) natural gas burning plant has been planned for opening in 2019. A 170 MW wind installation is planned for southwest Saskatchewan. This week SaskPower is consulting with Saskatchewanians about a proposed 60 MW solar addition to the grid by 2021. And 1 MW of natural gas created by human activity at the Regina landfill, has just come online this month.
According to SaskPower, over 90% of the power produced within Saskatchewan comes from fossil fuel sources. We import hydro from Manitoba, and generate some in Saskatchewan. A bit more hydroelectricity is planned at Tazi Twe, to add 50 MW by 2019. A little more at Saskatoon’s delayed river hydro project.
Not to bore you with basic math, but 350-170-60-50+1 = 71 MW more will come from burning fossil fuels to be added to the grid within the next 4 years. Their “Renewables Roadmap” lists only 210 MW more for wind and solar to be called for by this quarter in their Request for Proposals. This leaves a huge renewable electricity shortfall to be fixed in the remaining 9 years. Does SaskPower have an answer to this? Does the Premier? Are they hoping no one notices?

North Dakota Wind Beats Saskatchewan Coal

Want to verify these numbers?

But what does Saskatchewan’s government and Crown power corp do?
350MW more Gas is next. And they chased away the biggest local wind power proponent.

SaskPower’s Power To Grow A Nose

SaskPower’s latest consultant on renewable energy might be Pinocchio.

Their misinformation about renewable energy intentionally leaves out the point that our power mix is not entirely coal, hydro, or natural gas today, so it wouldn’t make sense to power every aspect of our grid with only PV solar which presently depends upon storage to deliver power on very cloudy days and at night. We can however, use solar to reach 100% renewable power on our grid’s mix. I’ve previously outlined two plausible ways this could be done with existing technology.