EVs Outselling Stick Shift

Not surprising, people are buying more EV cars than manual transmission ones.

Presently fewer than 10% are voting for EV as their preferred transmission type. As Mike points out, EVs don’t have a transmission, so is it really a fair comparison. Wouldn’t you rather drive a vehicle you don’t have to shift, has better acceleration, and has no transmission to break down?

UPDATE:

Dec. 2, come to the RPL Film Theatre for a special presentation by James Whittingham about why EVs are the best winter vehicles.

 

“Andrew Scheer here”

Billy Mays here with your latest As Seen On TV fad/junk:

If you missed the phony deadline to save $2, don’t worry, I have a way you can save thousands, and avoid paying the carbon tax too.


As you can read here, it’s already less expensive to buy a used EV than a new gas burning vehicle with most of the same features for city driving.

BONUS:

Civic Hatchback vs. LEAF Hatchback

Should you buy a Honda gas burner, or a pure electric Nissan if you need a family hatchback motor vehicle?

“2019 Civic hatchback and coupe models are priced […] at $20,150US and $19,350US, respectively. The base trim includes features like a rearview camera, Bluetooth, a 5-inch display screen, and a USB port.”

Currency exchange is about 1.34 to CAD right now, so that’s 20150*1.34 = $27000$26,265 (price updated Apr 27, 2019)

My used Nissan LEAF 2014 (bought 2 years ago), with the same technology features listed above plus rear heated seats, and heated steering wheel (handy in Winter): $15,500. At my old place, I had 8 solar panels which cost $8400 installed. Together that’s $23,900.

Now, I’m no financial genius, but a solar powered hatchback that costs $2365 less than a new gas burning hatchback, seems like a better idea.

Doubting sorts might question, can a $8400, 2kW solar array really power a Nissan LEAF. That’s a great question! The answer is complicated. The short answer is yes.

Using a Bluetooth OBDII car-computer reading gizmo to read the LEAF’s battery status with my phone and the app Leaf Spy Lite, it reveals the car’s battery has 20kWh of capacity, down from its brand new 24kWh selling point.

Using the Solar Edge website, I was able to determine that my array in March would typically produce more than 10kWh per day. That electricity is instantly used in the house, the EV if plugged in to charge, and the excess goes into the grid. The power company, SaskPower, provides a credit 1-for-1 for the electricity provided vs. taken from their grid in a set year. This is known as Net Metering.

(UPDATE Oct. 2019: The backwards Sask Party has ended Net Metering in Saskatchewan, there’s now a 0.5-for-1 credit instead. It may still be economical to get solar to offset an EV use,  but rerun your calculations.)

My household tends to charge the LEAF to 100% overnight on the regular wall plug (slow Level 1 charging this is called), and use it to about 50% capacity during the following day. That means it needs ~10kWh put back into it at night.  Astute readers will note that’s about how much power the panels are producing.

The LEAF doesn’t need gasoline, or oil changes. You can “fill” it at home on a regular wall plug. Why are people still buying new Civics? If they routinely travel more than 100km in the city in a day, or 70km at top highway speeds, the Civic might be more appealing, but it’s obviously more expensive and harder on your lungs and our planet’s creatures.

Now, if you want to save even more money, and more creatures, I have another tip for you:

$5000 Canadian Government Rebate for Some EVs

This means people who buy cars need to first of all NOT buy an EV to replace their gas burning commuter vehicle. “Whattt?” you’re saying. If everyone who has a car now continues to own an EV instead, we still won’t make it below our emissions target for 2030. What instead?

2. Invest in public transportation e.g. , , , and safe biking and walking infrastructure in our cities and even between our towns.

3. Encourage a switch to EVs, but also give financial incentives if people switch to the bus, or train, or ebikes. You could buy Canadians 3 ebikes for every $5000 spent on one automotive rebate.

4. If you rebate the purchase of new EVs, also offer it for used EVs. Adoption happens faster if a used $15000 LEAF is 33% less @ $10,000. A $37000 for $32000 isn’t as affordable.

A rebate that applies to only new cars may be what automakers want, but we’re in this huge mess *because* politicians did what automakers wanted. Instead do what Canadians want and need, and make low-carbon transportation super affordable, please.

I’m begging you, from my ebike.

Elizabeth May in Saskatchewan

It’s been another amazing day, and the Sun isn’t even down yet.
Attended a lunch-and-learn this morning with @ElizabethMay at the new CAC #UofR building.

Then we got a tour of Cowessess’s Renewable Energy facility a few kilometers past their gas station east of Regina on Arcola Ave.

Now May has left for Fort Qu’Appelle for a forum on climate change. It’s in Scheer’s home riding, but he declined to attend! (The coward…)
The official video of the event had sound issues. Here are some clips:

Convert Canada’s Fleet to EV

There’s no reason why Canada can’t set a 100% electric personal vehicle goal today. Please sign this petition to tell our heel dragging Liberal government to get on it. There are huge benefits to EVs over gas burners, with cleaner air as only one of the perks. They save owners lots of money too over complicated combustion engine vehicles.

I hope Saskatchewan beats Manitoba in signature count. Right now, we’re neck and neck with them.

EV Charging in Regina

This blog post is a 7 month update to my earlier summary of the status of EV charging in Regina.

Most EV owners charge at home, where they park for the night.

Better EV drivers charge where their shared car is parked, at a car sharing parking spot. None exist yet in Saskatchewan, but Saskatoon Car Share Co-op is actively working on providing that.

Ottawa has been talking about improving EV infrastructure for Canadians, but so far Saskatchewan isn’t part of that conversation with the feds. While private businesses have done a great deal with help from Sun Country Highways to build up Level 2 charging in many Canadian communities, the more rapid Level 3 chargers are out of reach for the average Canadian outside of BC, Quebec, or southern Ontario. The City of Regina has been unhelpful also, and the Province of Saskatchewan directed SGI to end a low-emissions vehicle rebate years ago. Former Minister McMillan now is the President of the Canadian Ass. of Petrol’ Producers. No conflict there, eh?

That’s right, Shell is beating the Canadian government on installing Level 3 chargers, albeit in the UK. Will Shell in Canada beat the EV-lovin’ Environment and Climate Change Minister on the mission to electrify Canada’s highway network?

P.S. Our Leaf cannot make use of Level 3 charging; we got it without one installed. Why bother, when there are 0 available in Saskatchewan? It charges on Level 1 at the house, or Level 2 at Peavey Mart or Winmar if going out of town. Thanks Sun Country Highway!