Flying Beavers and Other Technological Advancements

Air drop beavers to repopulate a species? OK, said the late 1940s.

We’ll need something better than flying beavers to survive climate change, says Bill Gates (who was once a great innovator out to get rich). Now he’s a rich person out to get innovative.

Maybe flying/falling tree planting? After all, it’s what trees do to plant themselves.

For #elxn42 I endorse Trudeau, but not the Liberals. #MoreGlobeEndorsements

This will come as quite a shock to many, since I’m a long time Green voter, but I’m endorsing Trudeau for PM, but think his party needs to start advising him better immediately after the election. This endorsement surprises even me, because I didn’t wake up knowing I was going to make it, I just got a giggle in my head when I thought of doing it, and it seemed like a good joke to make.

At least I’m free to make my endorsement as I see fit, no matter how ill advised.

Say’s Law – Supply Creates Demand

“A well-known dictum of macroeconomics is Say’s Law: that supply creates demand.”

I independently discovered this, I didn’t know it was called Say’s Law.

Before I created the Pet Foil Hat Technology, no one bought foil hats for pets. My supply, created the demand.
The same can be said for plenty of things in dollar stores, and even Value Village shelves at Halloween.

The Bank of England explains how it’s liable to overlook climate change action, until it’s too late.

Human drivers are judged extremely likely to have been the dominant cause of global warming since the mid-20th century.
The horizon for monetary policy extends out to 2-3 years. For financial stability it is a bit longer, but typically only to the outer boundaries of the credit cycle – about a decade.

In other words, once climate change becomes a defining issue for financial stability, it may already be too late.

This paradox is deeper, as Lord Stern and others have amply demonstrated. As risks are a function of cumulative emissions, earlier action will mean less costly adjustment.

The desirability of restricting climate change to 2 degrees above pre-industrial levels leads to the notion of a carbon ‘budget’, an assessment of the amount of emissions the world can ‘afford’.

Such a budget – like the one produced by the IPCC – highlights the consequences of inaction today for the scale of reaction required tomorrow.

I Feel Like I’ve Had To Say This Before

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Apple’s Welcoming Ceremony Challenged By Robot

I’m cool with a robot waiting in line for a little tech innovation.

It makes more sense than a human wasting their time.

“Since the iPhone’s official release in 2007, waiting outside for a new iPhone has become something of a tradition: a stupid, meaningless tradition, yes, but a tradition nonetheless. Every September we get to shake our heads at the people who are huddled up on the sidewalk, sleeping in tents, relieving themselves on our streets, creating a general Pigpen-like cloud of stench in the areas surrounding Apple Stores,”

I think lining up for Blackberry Mead in Regina is another stupid tradition that needs to change.

How fitting that Apple fans have turned the reception of a once revolutionary device into a religious ceremony that excludes acceptance of new devices and methods.