When a Gazillion Means Less Than One

I’ll update this blog post if an example is forthcoming. It’s been a day’s wait, but to the CTF the PM having a nanny is a bigger story than trying to shut down my province’s bus service.

STC’s parcel service makes a profit, and the passenger service doesn’t. There was once STC service to North Dakota, today there is not. There’s no means to get to the United States via bus without going a province over, so obviously improvements could be made. The best addition in recent years has been newer buses and Wi-Fi (although Wi-Fi’s worked only half of the two times I’ve tried it).

Yet even with those shortcomings, there would be no coming and going from many Saskatchewan towns without a public transportation bus service. Until passenger rail returns, we have to maintain a bus network, and can’t depend upon individuals to make a profit on our transportation network. My memorable experience with a private bus operator in Newfoundland was trying to get a ticket, and finding their phone number was out of service. Saskatchewan doesn’t need to step down to that level of service by dispensing of STC.


Hong Kong reminds me so much of Saskatchewan.

If You Don’t Like Canada…

Comments from CBC story, discussing the U-Pass at the University of Regina:

Corruptable writes:

forcing someone to pay for a bus pass they will not use is ludicrous. she would force everyone to pay for a parking spot that only some will use…

blue cheese responds:

getting taxed for schools when we have no children,
paying more on our power bills to provide cenovus with liquid co2
getting taxed for city recycling whether we want to or not
paying for the football stadium whether we use it or not
paying for healthcare whether sick or not
etc etc.
in canada we look out for everyone, if you don’t like canada, vote for a conservative. you will pay for all your services out of your own pocket and still pay taxes.

Saskatoon Lockout of Transit Workers Was Illegal

Saskatoon’s civic politicians are responsible for a City Manager who lost the City a month of transit service, at a price of over $1,000,000. Time for a firing, and maybe a few Councillors and the Mayor will lose their seats next time.

Saskatoon Shiners #exploresk

Saskatoon is a beautiful city, so don’t let these photos fool you. Every city has a few shiners here and there. “There”, in this case, is downtown.
Holiday Inn Supermax Prison
This is the Holiday Inn Supermax Prison. Don’t worry, it only looks like a prison from the outside. You can leave, unlike the more picturesque Hotel California.

Here’s one of the more beautiful parkades with a cell phone tower behind it.

It’s January, and the snow has retreated into puddles due to the unseasonal temperatures, but the gang activity hasn’t retreated.

The people of Saskatoon are friendly, and will accommodate you whether you’re addicted to tobacco or real estate.

The Sturdy Stone isn’t going to see you, so you should go see it.

The HMCS Unicorn will be grinning at you when you walk by.

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Drivers from Hill

MPs should not be driving, they should be walking, biking, or taking the OC Transpo.

Transportation: Where to go, and how to get there in #YQR

Most of my speech as heard in the video above, and posted to my Regina politics blog:

I’m very pleased to have been asked to speak at Campion College about transportation issues. I got my Computer Science – co-op degree from here a decade ago, and I never imagined at the time that I’d wind up the President of a different sort of “co-op”, the Regina Car Share Co-operative. At the time, I had no idea that “car sharing” was even a thing. I’d heard of car pooling of course, but they are different. It wasn’t until I returned to work at the UofR, that I got an email about a group of people holding a pot luck supper in Regina to discuss forming a “car share”, and I thought that sounded like maybe a good way to use a car without the unpleasantries of maintaining one. A few years later, I was chosen to help guide a remarkable group of volunteers who make organized car sharing possible in our city, as it is in almost every other major Canadian and American city today.

Why am I interested in transportation? Well, I’m interested in nearly everything, but where curiosity meets reality is on the streets. Nearly everyone in the world has a daily need to move about the farm, town, or city they live at, and so modes of transportation are essential to how and where we live. If transportation isn’t timely or fun, people don’t enjoy where they live as much as they should. I don’t think car repair is fun, and feel dealing with SGI is about the worst thing that could administratively happen to someone (short of being charged with a crime). So I’ve set out to make transportation both timely and fun for myself, and it just so happens that I need to make it that way for the people around me too, in order to be successful.

Another big reason I’m interested in transportation improvement, is that it’s a major contributor to air pollution and climate change. These are not small, or easy problems to solve, but our little daily actions collectively point our society in either the right or wrong direction. Right now, Regina is unquestionably pointed in the wrong direction, and among our collective actions pointing us there is how we get around every day. Since public talks are always more fun with interaction (I think so anyway, because otherwise I tend to get sleepy especially if the speaker has a mono-tone voice like mine,): How many people got to University today by themselves in a motor vehicle? How many car pooled? How many took the bus? How many biked or walked?
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Not A Lot

Not much to say tonight, except it was a busy and fulfilling weekend, with lots of community gathering, and plenty of optimism for the Spring, gardens, cycling, busing, and all sorts of improvements ahead.

How very much I look forward to being able to catch buses more easily on Sundays, or just skip them by being able to comfortably cycle to my destinations instead. Spring can’t come soon enough, but I’ll wait; The downside to wishing for time to fly by, is lamenting later on that the years passed by too quickly.