Still More Hawaiian Sights

Pearl Harbor

The 3rd day of driving, we headed toward the old Dole Plantation. After climbing a hill on the freeway, the Leaf’s battery was a little depleted especially since we started off at 66% since we couldn’t charge it overnight. We aimed for a free charger at a decidedly not-free health care clinic.

There was a huge solar array covered car-park behind it, and we circled the building only to finally find an EV charger that was either out of service, or not compatible with our EV. After learning from the support number on it that the troubleshooting steps I’d taken weren’t sufficient, we popped over to Tony Nissan to charge up. There were 3 Leafs there already, and only 2 chargers. One soon left after a couple minutes, and another Leaf rolled up with no miles remaining on the guessometer. I let him charge first, and we talked about his vehicle so I could learn more about owning an EV. The CHAdeMO charger at Tony had been broken for some time, and I overheard it wasn’t being repaired for months longer. That seemed totally unacceptable to me, but that’s what Nissan corporate in the USA wanted to do. Tony had shelled out $9000 already once to fix the cord on the charger, but it’d broken in some way again. I think there’s probably a design flaw, and some sort of replacement unit going in their place in the next few months.

We got our time on the charger, and rolled back down the hill and over to the other half of Pearl Ridge Mall that we had skipped the day before. This time we rode the Monorail over to the side with the giant Cook map on the floor, where we’d charged the car after the Tesla vacated the charging spot I waited 40 minutes for. We had to check all of the chargers before finding an available one. Another Leaf, and a BMW i3 were on the upper parkade chargers.

While charging, we had lunch, and shopped around a bit for jewelry and such. I popped out to see how the car was doing, and a young woman was charging her Leaf instead. Curious, I asked what was up, and she had to be across the island for a deadline of some sort, and apologized for interrupting my charging. I said it was okay, and to just plug me back in when she had enough for her destination.

Pearl Harbor

Then we went over to Pearl Harbor as it was closing, parked nearby, took some photos, parked again, took more photos, and got out of the lot just before they locked it up for the night.

Pearl Harbor

Pearl Harbor

We drove past an unfinished freeway hanging over us in the air, and through Honolulu killing time exploring while on our way to return the Leaf to Autoland.
Pearl Harbor

electric tree
An electric Leaf definitely needs an electric tree!

We enjoyed the sunset at the coast in a park, with some cats, newly married couples, and a few homeless people in tents.
cat fed in Kaka'ako park

wedding in park

U-Pass A Roaring Success

*takes a slight bow*

Now we have to order buses. Now!

When a Gazillion Means Less Than One

I’ll update this blog post if an example is forthcoming. It’s been a day’s wait, but to the CTF the PM having a nanny is a bigger story than trying to shut down my province’s bus service.

STC’s parcel service makes a profit, and the passenger service doesn’t. There was once STC service to North Dakota, today there is not. There’s no means to get to the United States via bus without going a province over, so obviously improvements could be made. The best addition in recent years has been newer buses and Wi-Fi (although Wi-Fi’s worked only half of the two times I’ve tried it).

Yet even with those shortcomings, there would be no coming and going from many Saskatchewan towns without a public transportation bus service. Until passenger rail returns, we have to maintain a bus network, and can’t depend upon individuals to make a profit on our transportation network. My memorable experience with a private bus operator in Newfoundland was trying to get a ticket, and finding their phone number was out of service. Saskatchewan doesn’t need to step down to that level of service by dispensing of STC.

UPDATE:

Hong Kong reminds me so much of Saskatchewan.

If You Don’t Like Canada…

Comments from CBC story, discussing the U-Pass at the University of Regina:

Corruptable writes:

forcing someone to pay for a bus pass they will not use is ludicrous. she would force everyone to pay for a parking spot that only some will use…

blue cheese responds:

@Corruptable
like
getting taxed for schools when we have no children,
paying more on our power bills to provide cenovus with liquid co2
getting taxed for city recycling whether we want to or not
paying for the football stadium whether we use it or not
paying for healthcare whether sick or not
etc etc.
in canada we look out for everyone, if you don’t like canada, vote for a conservative. you will pay for all your services out of your own pocket and still pay taxes.

Saskatoon Lockout of Transit Workers Was Illegal

Saskatoon’s civic politicians are responsible for a City Manager who lost the City a month of transit service, at a price of over $1,000,000. Time for a firing, and maybe a few Councillors and the Mayor will lose their seats next time.

Saskatoon Shiners #exploresk

Saskatoon is a beautiful city, so don’t let these photos fool you. Every city has a few shiners here and there. “There”, in this case, is downtown.
Holiday Inn Supermax Prison
This is the Holiday Inn Supermax Prison. Don’t worry, it only looks like a prison from the outside. You can leave, unlike the more picturesque Hotel California.

Here’s one of the more beautiful parkades with a cell phone tower behind it.
Saskatoon

It’s January, and the snow has retreated into puddles due to the unseasonal temperatures, but the gang activity hasn’t retreated.
Saskatoon

The people of Saskatoon are friendly, and will accommodate you whether you’re addicted to tobacco or real estate.
Saskatoon

Saskatoon
The Sturdy Stone isn’t going to see you, so you should go see it.

The HMCS Unicorn will be grinning at you when you walk by.
Saskatoon

Continue reading

Drivers from Hill

MPs should not be driving, they should be walking, biking, or taking the OC Transpo.