ConCalls: Conclusions You Can Confirm Using CIMS Computer #RoboCon #cdnpoli

Stephen Taylor was confused this morning. If he read my blog instead of dismissing me as a bother, he wouldn’t be so confused. He thought the Federal Court Robocalls judgement was saying that no Conservative could have been involved, because the judge had said he’d seen no evidence suggesting that. I can’t factually explain why the judge couldn’t make the logical inference that a secure database controlled tightly by the CPC, could only be used by authorized and known individuals. The judge ruled CIMS was the database used for election fraud in 2011. It is not a leap to conclude that unknown senior Conservatives were involved in election fraud.

Taylor went on to ignore the fact that Guelph was not among the six ridings challenged by citizen applicants with the assistance of the Council of Canadians in Federal Court.

Judge Mosley himself praised the eight applicants for their virtue, while chastising the Conservative MPs. “It has seemed to me that the applicants sought to achieve and hold the high ground of promoting the integrity of the electoral process while the respondent MPs engaged in trench warfare in an effort to prevent this case from coming to a hearing on the merits.”

More shocking, Taylor floats an alternate theory that “Chinese hackers” could have been involved in the 2011 election fraud!

His theory is more shocking than the Conservative Party participating in widespread election fraud. He’s suggested that a foreign government (or foreign citizens) have conspired with (or against) the Conservative Party of Canada, to conceal the identity of specific Conservatives involved in telling citizens incorrect addresses of polling stations, in order to prevent Canadians from voting. Surely the politicians in charge of the Government of Canada would launch a full scale investigation to rule out this insane, severe, and remote possibility?

Mound of Sound has some sound conclusions you can make, instead of reading more of Stephen Taylor’s babbling.

[Justice Mosely wrote,] “I am satisfied that it has been established that misleading calls about the locations of polling stations were made to electors in ridings across the country, including the subject ridings, and that the purpose of those calls was to suppress the votes of electors who had indicated their voting preference in response to earlier voter identification calls,” and that “the most likely source of the information used to make the misleading calls was the CIMS database maintained and controlled by the CPC [Conservative Party of Canada], accessed for that purpose by a person or persons currently unknown to this Court.”

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3 responses to “ConCalls: Conclusions You Can Confirm Using CIMS Computer #RoboCon #cdnpoli

  1. Sums it up. Somebody with access did it, but no evidence as to who that somebody is was presented in this trial. So the courts can actually use common sense it seems, but seriously, I came to the same conclusion about ten minutes after the story broke.

    http://greencanada.wordpress.com/2012/03/04/mechanics-of-robo-calling-not-a-fluke-or-rogue-campaigner-someone-who-had-access-did-these-things/

    Too bad nobody with serious money was funding this suit. they could have gone to town, and actually spent some money finding all those people who actually received calls, still had recorded messages of robocalls, etc. Court case on a small budget with bottomless pockets on the CPC team, not surprising that they found fraud, but no culprit

  2. Forget the past; this sets up our future for a big fall. Harper’s kleptocracy continues to grow.

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