#PremierPipeline: Good Work Premier Brad Wall

“People are advised not to consume fish caught in the river, and to avoid water activities that may result in river water being ingested,” said a news release put out Tuesday morning.

six days later.

“Good work Premier Brad Wall. No loss of life like at Lac Megantic oil tanker rail disaster. Naturally occurring biological decontamination will help clean up this oil spill in no time!” – Tim

Yes, this is the sort of deranged partisanship that makes Canada’s most popular Premier able to slither out of responsibility for an oil spill that has poisoned the major drinking water source for Saskatchewan’s 3rd largest city and other cities and towns and farms and beyond.

Great Blue Heron?
Naw, it’s just a Big Red Herring, apparently. That damn bird might cost the province future pipelines, and isn’t that the real tragedy here?

“The company responsible, Husky Energy, has been very cooperative and as soon as they were aware of the incident they notified us,” Kotyk said [Friday].

“In an email, Husky communications official Mel Duval confirmed with CBC that the report submitted to government was incorrect.

Husky now says “at approximately 8 p.m. [Wednesday] the pipeline monitoring system indicated pressure anomalies as several segments of the pipeline system were being returned to service. This is common during startup operations.””

The deputy minister for the Ministry of Economy, which regulates pipelines, said Husky has an emergency response plan in place, filed with the government.

But Laurie Pushor doesn’t know if it was followed.

Good work Premier Brad Wall. Bravo. Encore? We have a SOUTH Saskatchewan River too awaiting your next slick triumph.
Wall pocketing pollution sun news

#PremierPipeline’s Slick Advice in Wake of Husky Oil Spill: Don’t Turn to Trains

But one of the big issues for Brad Wall, a major proponent for the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, was the Husky Energy oil spill into the North Saskatchewan River at Maidstone Thursday morning.
Wall says he hopes this spill does not make it harder to sell new energy infrastructure. He points out that if it isn’t moved by pipeline it will be moved by rail and he says rail is more susceptible to spills, combined with the greenhouse gas emissions given off by the trains themselves.

Wall says the first priority in regards to the Husky Energy spill is to get it cleaned up but pointed out that while pipelines remain imperfect in terms of a conveyance for oil, they’re still the safest way to move oil and it is 4.5 times more likely to have an oil spill on a rail car than a pipeline.

So, how about those train emissions, eh? Building a pipeline is done with fairy dust and unicorn labour, I guess?

ADDED: I hope this disaster doesn’t lead to a bigger disaster that takes the form of harming the sale of my most cherished oil distribution technologies I campaigned on expanding.

Now, about those pipeline emissions…

Husky Energy says between 200,000 and 250,000 litres of crude oil and other material leaked into the North Saskatchewan River Thursday morning near Maidstone. Efforts are being made by Husky to contain the spill through the use of booms across the river

The boom has gone bust. #SaskaBoom

In a telephone conference with reporters, officials from the province of Saskatchewan said they had built five booms to contain the spill and were working with Husky and the federal government on a cleanup plan.

The oil plume had passed the village of Maymont, more than 100 km (62 miles) downstream from where the spill started, said Wes Kotyk, executive director of environment protection with the province.

““We’re asking our residents to conserve water by not watering their lawns,” Ms. Abe said.”

October is coming with freezing nights.

Ferris said the city of Prince Albert, farther along the river, was building a temporary pipeline (hose) of up to 30 km (19 miles) to draw water from another river.

“It won’t work in winter in Saskatchewan, I can guarantee you that,” he said.

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Ban Microbeads Now

Send an email to: ec.produits-products.ec@canada.ca

Dear Minister McKenna:

There is no need to give pollution a chance to overwhelm our water and enter our food chain. Plastic microbeads are considered a toxin by your own scientists, and there is no need for them to be in personal care products like face cream and toothpaste. If an abrasive, non-toxic substance is desired by manufacturers and consumers, use sand.

End the consultation period now, and proceed with the ban immediately. During health studies of new drugs, if they are found by science to cause obvious harm or benefit, the testing may end early. This is no different. Microbeads should not have been approved in the first place (if they ever were approved). They remain on the shelves of Real Canadian Superstore today, and it’s a disgrace they haven’t been recalled.

John Klein

Oil and Gas Still Not Four Letter Words?

Brad Wall, speaking directly to oil and gas men, remarked that he thinks Ottawa needs a “champion” of non-renewable energy. There’s been more than enough support for that industry in the past decades.

This is a good sector, that oil and gas are not four letter words. That they create untold quality of life and wealth for all Canadians. Let’s make that case.

“At one point, a list of dozens of items made from derivatives of petrochemicals were highlighted on a projector screen[…]

“The smartphones they use perhaps to send you angry Tweets about your industry or send you texts,” he joked.

It’s unclear if clean water or clean air that made Wall’s speech possible had been consumed by the Premier, or if he’d denied himself these things his policies aim to end. Clearly he’d have difficulty making arguments against having these necessities, without clean air and water throughout his life.


The detractors seem to think it is impossible for Saskatchewan to go fossil fuel-free because it’s cold. Actually, Saskatchewan engineers long ago pioneered energy efficient buildings that require little to no fossil fuel heating. What’s “wacky” is that we don’t have building standards that would make conventional heating obsolete and deliver thousands in energy savings.

Shared Knowledge Conference – Regina

These videos are from the second day of the Shared Knowledge Conference at the Core Ritchie Centre, the second weekend of June.

Jim Elliott with many interesting (and terrifying) facts about Regina’s watershed system.

James and Brooke of Sound Solar Systems:

Next, I presented on Bitcoin and alternate currencies being used to build alternate economies apart from the monetary systems provided by governments.

Dan B. of Tradebank Regina

Lindsay H. wraps up with what’s in store for next time.