More Sights In Hawaii

After a couple nights at the first place we stayed, we dropped off our keys and picked up the ones for the next place. The timeshare employees moved our bags for us once the rooms were cleaned, which was convenient.

Army museum closed for President's Day weekend

On Monday, President’s Day, we hopped on the bus to the other side of Honolulu, and picked up our rental car, an electric Nissan Leaf. After getting a quick tour of the car, (but not one where we retained that there was a USB port available to charge our phones), we took off into the distance not entirely sure where to go. I reasoned we should set a free car charger as our next stop, so we picked one east of Waikiki on the Plugshare app on my phone, and set the phone’s GPS to navigate us to it. When we were almost there, we pulled over into a large free parking lot to take a quick look and stretch.
A few minutes later we pulled into a busy parking lot, and immediately spotted the free Volta-branded EV charger, and the parking spot was available narrowly. I squeezed in beside a pickup, and we plugged in.
Hawaii

With up to 2 hours to kill, we wandered off to find lunch. There was an Italian place, and we got a window table by the boat docks.
Hawaii
I tried calamari steak for the first time, and it was good, but there was a lot of it. American sized meal portions remain a bit of a problem even for a bottomless pit like myself.

The car was fully charged again when we returned to it, after charging our phones in a mall hallway outlet. We set off for the next charger. We stopped along the way at the rocky ocean side where there was a free parking spot with lots of tourists doing the same.
Hawaii
Leaf parked

The Target we ended up at had chickens and roosters wandering around the parking lot. The EV charger was busy though, so we explored the town more after taking a wrong turn once and having to go in a circle.

We found the grocery store charger was busy too, but another pair of chargers (one working and occupied) provided us with some free juice after only a 30 minute shopping wait. We walked over to another mall nearby, and there was a nice sitting area with an outdoor phone charging stand. One of the haggard parents we saw there with a little girl, we ran into later on the Luau bus trip we took on Thursday.

On our way back to Waikiki, there was a charger near a McDonalds, but it only worked for 5 minutes without a payment option. So we drove back, parked, and went to supper at Cheeseburger in Paradise. Delicious, and you really pay for the location.

Cheeseburger in Paradise

golf course
The golf course visible from our condo’s balcony.

sunset
The next day’s sunset after a bit of shopping at Pearl Ridge, I found the beach to be a bit too well used.
sunset

sunset
For an unused beach, the parking security across the street was annoying given that their parking lot was empty and their suggestion was to park only 40m away on the dirt. I ended up finding a better spot adjacent to the beach, after a U-turn on the non-busy street.

A Racist Killing In Progress, in Canada

A man with a group of people went looking to injure First Nations people, from their truck.

A hospital won’t put the dying woman onto organ donor lists to get replacement organs for ones damaged in the attack, because she’s had alcohol in the last half year.

Hate-crimes everywhere you look in Northern Ontario. Can something not be done besides prepare for the funeral?

 

CBC Interviewed a Gunman?

This is a wee bit outrageous.

On March 21, 1977, Robert McLagan held 11 employees at Toronto’s Banque Canadienne Nationale hostage for nearly 12 hours.

Frum and her producers were able to get McLagan, one of his hostages and a police officer on the line as the situation was unfolding — even giving CBC Radio listeners the chance to hear the beginning of a negotiation that would eventually end in a peaceful surrender.

“I’ll maybe release them a little bit later,” he says. “But I see your boys out here getting a little bit psyched up, but the front door’s unlocked and I’ve got a damned good vantage point where I can see the door and I can see the stairwell. So outside of a gung-ho charge or anything, there’s not really a hell of a lot you can do.”

The interview ends there, but according to the Toronto Star archives, the suspect eventually surrendered quietly and nobody was harmed.

How Safe Will the Model 3 Be?

The Tesla Model 3 could be the safest car on the road — and that’s bad news for every other automaker

MORGAN STANLEY: Tesla’s Model 3 may be 10x safer than any car on the road today

Frank Chaparro

Mar. 23, 2017, 11:08 AM

 

It’s expected to be so safe, that Business Insider published two stories about it, in the span of an hour. One, with two glaring typos I spotted right away.

SaskPower Is Going To Miss Target

March 16, 2017
Dear Editor,
People should be asking how SaskPower intends to meet the 50% renewable electricity by 2030 target set by the Premier over a year ago. Since that announcement, a 350 MegaWatt (MW) natural gas burning plant has been planned for opening in 2019. A 170 MW wind installation is planned for southwest Saskatchewan. This week SaskPower is consulting with Saskatchewanians about a proposed 60 MW solar addition to the grid by 2021. And 1 MW of natural gas created by human activity at the Regina landfill, has just come online this month.
According to SaskPower, over 90% of the power produced within Saskatchewan comes from fossil fuel sources. We import hydro from Manitoba, and generate some in Saskatchewan. A bit more hydroelectricity is planned at Tazi Twe, to add 50 MW by 2019. A little more at Saskatoon’s delayed river hydro project.
Not to bore you with basic math, but 350-170-60-50+1 = 71 MW more will come from burning fossil fuels to be added to the grid within the next 4 years. Their “Renewables Roadmap” lists only 210 MW more for wind and solar to be called for by this quarter in their Request for Proposals. This leaves a huge renewable electricity shortfall to be fixed in the remaining 9 years. Does SaskPower have an answer to this? Does the Premier? Are they hoping no one notices?

Letter to MLA regarding STC Closure/Privatization

Dear Mrs. Beaudry-Mellor:

I’m dismayed by your government’s cut of all rural SK bus service. This is a horrible decision that isolates people in small towns and cities, and harms people who cannot drive including people who are blind, or unable or unwilling to operate a private motor vehicle. It will increase the cost of healthcare delivery. Package delivery to rural Saskatchewan is also harmed. Charter buses will be harder to obtain in our province now too.

Rather than cut an essential public transportation service that will literally never be offered by the private sector or even a co-operative (because it will never make money), the PST could have been raised to 6.5%. This would pay to improve public transportation across the province. Did you realize that your government gives close to $0/year to regular public transportation, which makes it a Canadian anomaly. In an increasingly urbanizing province, might it be a good idea to ensure people don’t sit in traffic jams daily? One could assume that the SaskParty doesn’t care about public transportation, people without cars in rural Saskatchewan, or building solutions to reduce air pollution.

I hope you can work to reverse this short-sighted cut, because I fear that once the service is privatized, another responsible government will not take the time to build a crown service that is required for prosperity in rural Saskatchewan.

Sincerely,

John Klein

Regina

P.S. The Canadian Taxpayers Federation is no doubt overjoyed by this privatization. I asked them in 2015 for an example of a private bus service that would serve as the model for one in Saskatchewan to use if we lost STC. They suggested one in Hong Kong. Seriously. Saskatchewan is so much like Hong Kong apparently. I guess if you don’t reverse the cut, the SaskParty could bring in consultants from Hong Kong to help. If they cost less than $12Mil to consult, you’d still save money.

UPDATE: Instead of the “human conversation” promised in her Facebook ads, I got a form letter response that didn’t address my points or ideas.

Hello John

Thank you for sharing your concerns about the provincial budget.

As you know, Saskatchewan is faced with a difficult challenge due to resource revenue being down over $1 billion for three years, tax revenue down due to resource sector slowdown (corporate tax), and a growing population adding pressure to vital services. Our plan includes controlling and reducing spending, modernizing and expanding the tax system, investing in priority areas, and returning to balance over three years.

Meeting the challenge requires very difficult choices, not the least of which is winding down STC. Despite the company’s best efforts, ridership continues to drop

and costs continue to soar, the per passenger subsidy ballooning from $25 per passenger to $94 in the last decade alone. The growing burden is not sustainable and the government made the decision that the funding would be best used on core priorities.

{Why is public transportation not a “core priority” for the SaskParty?}

Knowing your concerns is helpful as we move forward. I take feedback from constituents seriously and truly appreciate you taking the time to write.

Sincerely,

Tina

Sent on behalf of

The Honourable Tina Beaudry-Mellor, MLA
196 Massey Road, Regina, SK   S4S 4N5
T: []
E: []

I’ve included corrections and facts that supplement Tina’s letter.