Wood Mountain: Population 21

When I was ten, my family picked up an exchange student from the Regina airport. It was Winter. As the South American boy rode with me on the van bench, across an open prairie between Regina and Moose Jaw, he asked how many people lived in Wood Mountain. I replied proudly, “Forty people live in Wood Mountain.” I knew, because I could count every one by going through each home in my mind, up and down the three streets, and three avenues. “Forty thousand?” he prompted for more details. “No, forty people.”

The school closed about three years later. The second last elevator burned in 1997 due to lightning strikes. The last wooden elevator in the village was demolished in 2014. There’s still a Community Hall, a rural post office and RM/Village office, a fire hall, a church, and Department of Highways buildings, and there are 21 people who live right in the village. More than a few live on the farms and ranches nearby. It’s still a community, and it still matters. Now, it’s Population 21.

It’s not even the second time Wood Mountain has been featured in a National Film Board documentary, but it is the first with my parents.

Stranded Assets, Saskatchewan Style

A report by a little known government entity says what I have been saying about pipelines stranding assets:

Its overall conclusion, however, urges caution when it comes to long-term investments in pipelines and other oil and gas infrastructure.

Such investments “could be at high risk of becoming economically unviable as prices in renewable electricity further decline,” it warns.

I happened to also be writing the Leader Post to question why its columnist wrote that coal isn’t going away for a foreseeable 30-40 years!

Dear Editor:

In response to Bruce Johnstone’s “Carbon capture critics see the world the way it should be, not the way it is”, there are some apparent inaccuracies.

One needs only to look to SaskPower’s own predictions of the power mix in 2030 to learn that coal-fired generation as it exists today, will cease to exist in only 14 years. The Conservatives, hardly traditional climate change fighters, passed this into law. Johnstone’s prediction that it “is unlikely to decline significantly in the next 30 or 40 years.” seems out of step with what is most likely.
It’s unclear why a technology that doesn’t exist is listed as a possible silver bullet, rather than examining geothermal which the Premier and SaskPower both have said could come to our aid in short years.

Johnstone feels the $1.5 billion invested in CCS is a solution, but in his own words “defeat[s] its own purpose”, through its enhanced oil recovery. Isn’t it a bit like taking material to patch a hole in the bow of your boat, from the hull of the stern?

Johnstone cites MIT’s Herzog as believing “that renewables alone cannot help us achieve our climate change goals”, but there are other experts like Stanford’s Mark Z. Jacobson who believe they can. Regina’s Dr. Brett Dolter can explain other possibilities for Saskatchewan’s grid that leave coal and CCS in the past, while renewable energy sources build the province and economy.

“It is increasingly plausible to foresee a future in which cheap renewable electricity becomes the world’s primary power source and fossil fuels are relegated to a minority status,” concludes Policy Horizons Canada.
Yet Johnstone concludes with, “So it would be a huge mistake, not to mention a huge waste of taxpayers’ money, to give up on carbon capture now.”

This runs completely contrary to the advice from Policy Horizons Canada.
“[We] suggest that governments ensure that the risks of further investments in oil and gas infrastructure be borne by private interests rather than taxpayers,” the report reads.”

SaskPower is a public interest and bears the risk of CCS. While Cenovus, a private venture, benefits from the waste CO2 production.
Whose perspective is Johnstone arguing for?

Sincerely,
John Klein
Regina

http://leaderpost.com/opinion/columnists/johnstone-carbon-capture-critics-see-the-world-the-way-it-should-be-not-the-way-it-is

Alternate shorter version below, the word limit was 250, instead of 350.:
Continue reading

#RoboCon: Revisiting the 2008 Election Fraud

In light of this news from Elizabeth May, it may be worth re-reading these blog entries from 2012  and 2009. Duffy’s trial raised some damning information about the first infamous robocalls used to steal an election for the Conservatives in B.C.

And read Alison’s more recent recap. I certainly think that Duffy’s testimony should be taken seriously by investigators and charges should be pursued.

Kevin Vickers, Perpetual Body Guard

Man speaking at the service while a protester is arrested after being manhandled by Canadian diplomat and hero of the Parliament Hill shooting, Kevin Vickers:
“All lives are equal in value and 2016 must be a year in which the narratives of everyone on this island of Ireland, are included and heard. This is how we can truly honour the vision of the 1916 proclamation.”

UPDATE: @ PPG dinner:
“I hope everybody that’s standing realizes what happened to the last guy that pissed me off,” Vickers said, referring to his tackling of an Irish protester at a ceremony commemorating British war dead in Dublin last month.

Media Captivated By Chicken Flap Gibberish

BREAKING: Residents are terrified as their beloved #KFCBuffet comes under threat. Premier steps in to help people #SkipTheDishes.

STANDING UP FOR SASKATCHEWAN Buffets

My government believes in a strong Saskatchewan within a smorg and united Kentucky Fried Nation.
But it is troubling that today, there are some vegetarians in this country who, given the opportunity, would shut down major parts of Saskatchewan’s Skip The Dishes economy and put thousands of hard-working Saskatchewan people out of work and into the street they must then cross like a chicken traversing a grid road, all in the name of some misguided dogma that has no basis in reality.

There are those who are not comfortable with and even oppose much of what we produce in Saskatchewan and how we produce it – oil and greasy chicken the Colonel was proud of.

What is the Premier’s fascination with fast food anyway?

Who remembers that the Harper Government rode to power on “Standing up for Canada” as its campaign slogan? That’s when Harper first used election fraud known as In & Out to overspend on their election campaign.


Hat Tip to Jay Bird

Premier Wall Has Hack Hurling Hypocrite Insults #skpoli

The Premier recently had the Lieutenant Governor read the throne speech for his new government session. In it, she said that some unnamed people following a “misguided dogma” with “no basis in reality” needed to be stopped from destroying our economy while they aim to protect our environment.

“They look at those jobs [in oil & gas, coal and uranium] like they are somehow harming the country and the world.” No dark side to those industries whatsoever, right? Place hands firmly over eyes after stuffing ears, please.

It’s an obvious bit of climate change denialism formalized by a government who has then inexplicably spent over $1.5 Billion on carbon capture and sequestration with the guise of reducing climate change causing emissions. Why solve a problem that isn’t real and isn’t somehow harming anyone, right? (Here’s the answer to that rhetorical question.)

After my blog post, a Wall hack contacted me (and nearly anyone who tweeted the Premier about the shocking attack on reality).

christina s. 2016-05-19 00:19:00 -0400
I contacted Premier Wall recently to ask why Saskatchewan continues to advertise drilling for oil and gas while fires rip through the province and I was told that because I use plastic and petroleum I was a hypocrite and deserved ridicule. I’m stunned to know that we have politicians operating at this infantile, ignorant and arrogant level.

If you doubt that claim, check out what Premier Wall’s “professional hack” wrote:

With the country’s Climate Change Minister coming to Saskatchewan, I hope she has some very frank and public words for Premier Wall and Climate “skeptic” Environment Minister Cox.

The government should not be telling people they won’t talk with them about reducing pollution if they have a car, or a cell phone. It’s a blatant attempt to silence critics of a province who has lagged in developing its wind, solar, hydro, and geothermal power resources. Boldly, their unproven claim is that no other SK government has ever invested as much in renewable energy. The throne speech also mentions investing in “clean” energy, but never in the context of reducing climate change causing gas emissions. It does take a moment to give a shout-out to Ronald Reagan though.

For those keeping score at home on your Throne Speech Bingo Sheet, that’s
Dead Presidents – 2 & Climate Change – 0.

ADDED: Wall’s comments “immature“. I’d go a step further and call them reckless and dangerous given what we know about climate change’s dangers.

Wall’s Government Denies Climate Change

Wall had the Lieutenant Governor read to the Legislature that opposition to climate change is a “misguided dogma” in his throne speech.

https://you.leadnow.ca/petitions/tell-saskatchewan-s-premier-to-stop-denying-climate-change-and-act

The Premier and the Sask Party are making it government policy that a contributing factor in the wildfires that caused thousands of refugees to flee their homes last year in Saskatchewan, is actually a hoax intended to harm our economy. A misguided dogma contributed to the partial razing of Fort MacMurrray, chasing almost a hundred thousand people from their homes and jobs?

“Lots of talk about the environment,” Wall grumbled [at COP21] in Paris. “But not a lot of talk about the economy right now.”

That’s Wall’s usual response whenever climate change comes up: portray the issue as a false choice between the environment and the economy.

But even Wall’s old friend Preston Manning thinks that line of argument is tired and worn out.

Let’s entertain Wall’s ridiculous claim for a moment, and say that climate change and shifting to a low-carbon economy are not based in reality. What is his government doing with official webpages devoted to something he now claims is not real? Is his “God bless” multiple times at the end of his speech not enough evidence that he’s actually a fan of some dogma not based in reality?

“In a world where China and India are going to continue to build new coal (plants), we think that Canada can contribute to the global effort on climate change by cleaning it up, making it cleaner than natural gas even,” said Wall.

Why has Wall spent $1,500,000,000 on purportedly reducing climate change gas emissions to clean what he yesterday claimed is a “misguided dogma’ designed to rob people of work? From his misguided, indefensible perspective, is he admitting to investing over a billion dollars into a job stealing scam?

From a Government webpage:
Wall said CCS has a pivotal role to play in the mitigation of climate change […]”, “some misguided dogma that has no basis in reality.

On CBC:
“I don’t know how Saskatchewan can be an outlier in this when we are offering a potential solution,” to “some misguided dogma that has no basis in reality.”

What’s the Premier’s reaction to being called out for his attack on climate science, and the people supporting action based on it? More defiance in supposed defence of carbon burning jobs that help make us a world leader in emissions per capita.

His speech tone was very much like the one he uses when talking with Big Oil executives, and unlike the more balanced tone when speaking more publicly with people less biased toward carbon-burning industries.
I was reminded of this gaffe: