Oh My

Monday morning CBC news with David Common led with the story of Elizabeth May’s failed PPG skit on Saturday. How’s that for perspective? These are the people who until last month had been considering not even letting the Green Party leader speak at the televised leaders’ debates, and now she’s a top story two days after a gaffe.

May told Hiscox that she was attempting to play off her image as a “goody-goody two shoes” in Parliament.

“I never heckle, I never swear, I’m respectful to everyone, so I’d gotten the idea that as skit material, it would be be funny if I were different from how I actually am,” she said.

“That obviously doesn’t work… especially in a clip out of context from the whole event.”

kinsellawarren:
“So, @ElizabethMay’s thing wasn’t funny and was likely, er, over-refreshed. But the top news story everywhere? Seriously?”

“I was trying — and obviously failing, badly — at delivering something a bit edgy, and in hindsight, should have realized that I had travelled so much in the previous 48 hours that I was probably too sleep deprived to pull it off properly.”

rocnrule:
“Ironically, sleep deprivation was also the reason Khadr agreed to a plea deal…”

Fair and Balanced Questions

As you probably know, “Fair and Balanced” is the Fox News tagline that exists to trick the more easily fooled into thinking that’s what their actual objective is.

Check out today’s story from the Vancouver Observer about “@FairQuestions”, a Conservative friendly researcher who took thousands of dollars in speaking fees from oil companies and testified for Conservative ends in Parliament. This, after being connected to lucrative oil money roles through Senator Duffy.

The $10,000 fees were paid by the Association for Mineral Exploration of BC (AMEBC), Canadian Energy Pipelines Association (CEPA) and Taseko Mines between March 22nd and June 6, 2012. The Inuvik Petroleum Show paid $6000 for a June 21 appearance, along with Amanda Lang and Ezra Levant.

The B.C. mining group also appeared to go out of its way to pay her.

“We usually don’t have fees,” said John Buchanan, Director of Communications and Public Affairs of AMEBC. “It’s a professional opportunity. It’s a way for speakers to give back to their industry.”

www. ezralevant. com/protecting_canadas_future has a video of Krause on Levant’s former Sun News show.

ADDED: One of the most disturbing points in the video is when Krause says she thinks the debate has been skewed because big money from the cities is drowning out small voices in rural Canada, and that funding should be “out in the open”.

The Hilarious Alberta Election

Last Alberta election it was the ridiculously wrong polling that was the news story.

Then the Wild Rose Party leader switched inexplicably to the PCs, and blew up her political chances in the next few decades. And then the polling was right (or led to the unexpected outcome) and the Alberta NDP are now a majority government.

The PC’s solution to relinquishing power for the first time in decades involves a lot of paper shredders to cover up corruption and make the job more difficult for the incoming NDP.

A friend of mine a couple weeks ago asked me if I’d heard was was going to happen in Alberta. I said no. He said, it’s going to be an NDP majority government. I was skeptical. The day of the election I guessed an NDP minority, at best.

The amount of wounded people talking of moving just because one non-violent political party replaced another, is seriously messed up.

A few closing thoughts on what was an amazing night on Twitter where no disaster took place, aside from the implosion of the PCs, and Prentice’s petulant, post-electoral resignation:

Continue reading

American and Canadian Food Waste Both Staggering

Here’s a very interesting and instructive blog post about American food waste.

As my last blog entry on food waste, Rob Greenfield brought the previous link to my attention. Canada’s $31,000,000,000.00/year of wasted food has to change, as does America’s “food waste fiasco“.

Regina lost one of its few grocery stores without a food wasting compactor, a couple years ago. A pickup truck’s worth of unwanted food could be going to food banks in Regina every day from each grocery store here. As long as the food isn’t spoiled, they are protected in law.

Made In Canada Conservative Hypocrisy

“Canada had long been a proponent of harmonizing our climate-change policy with the U.S. until the U.S. started to fight climate change.”

First it was the “Made in Canada” scam plan (that never appeared). Then it was, “We will act when our American partners do.” Now that Americans are acting, it’s exposed the climate denial-ism of the Conservative Party.

So what happened? Why has the government suddenly changed course? The reality seems to be that harmonization has just been an excuse the federal government used to justify doing nothing, and then quickly abandoned as soon as it meant doing something.

“Apparently, the government is now looking for today’s climate laggard to harmonize with.”
– “Tim Gray is executive director of Environmental Defence.”

The Baseload Mistake

One of the hangups some of my friends have about converting the electrical grid to renewable energy, has been the difficulty in storing electricity generated for use when energy input is reduced. Tesla Energy should help with that logistical problem.

In the meantime, we’re dealing with homes, power grids, and even an economy that cannot easily survive even short interruptions of constant energy input. That has to change to make our way of life even close to sustainable.

Is “baseload” power from coal even that important in grids of the near future?

“We all know that the wind doesn’t blow consistently and the sun doesn’t shine every day,” he said, “but the nuclear industry would have you believe that humankind is smart enough to develop techniques to store nuclear waste for a quarter of a million years, but at the same time human kind is so dumb we can’t figure out a way to store solar electricity overnight. To me that doesn’t make sense.”

Arnie Gunderson is right that it shouldn’t sit right with people.

Forbes wonders if nuclear power is now going to die. Not anytime soon, there’s too many billions of dollars already sunk into the technology and that industry is not going to go peacefully into the night as it runs out of money to manage security for all of the nuclear and industrial wastes it’s created.