Avoid Brown’s Social House

Nicola Tee wrote:

Hey! Just wondering why you have the archaic & sexist rule that your waitresses have to wear a minimum 1″ heel while they’re on their feet all night? The men don’t have the same rule. That’s terrible, and I actually won’t be back because of it. Please pass that on to head office, thanks.

Brown’s wrote: “the policy that our girls need to be in a 1″ heel is a brand standard…”

I won’t be opting to return to Browns because of this. I’m also going to be telling my friends to avoid Browns, and will be posting this response to my blog. If you decide to modernize your policy and lose the sexist attitude toward your employees’ clothing, please let me know so I can update everyone.

If you operated in a location where women weren’t allowed to work, or perhaps people of a particular race, would your “brand standard” adapt to that? In Saskatchewan, we try not to institutionalize sexism. At least I’d rather not support it.

(A pair of commenters note that Earls and Moxxies adhere to the same archaic code, so good to avoid them too.)

When a Tree Falls in Saskatchewan

While reading news page comment sections, even hopeless trolls who’d normally mock people saving trees by “hugging” them, have seen the light because of the nanny-state circumstance dooming the trees they’ve been coached to hate even more than “tree huggers”.

Saskatchewan is a province of leaders. We lead the country in smoking. We lead the world in per capita Green House Gas emissions. And we’re leading the fight against the trees and their sinister plot to break all of our childrens’ legs.

Alberta P3 News #skpoli

Here’s some news hot out of Alberta. Only one of them is satirical.

The other satirical bit is that Saskatchewan’s Sask Party recently announced they’d be saving taxpayers millions of dollars by starting a P3 Bike Share like Stettler had. No wait, they said they were going to build P3 schools, after the Alberta model, to build schools faster.

A Plan Designed To Fail Is No Plan At All #skpoli

“While it’s not immediately clear what impact the Obama (climate change) plan will have on the province, the government of Saskatchewan has taken measures to address the greenhouse gas issue through the development of programs and policies that will reduce our CO2 emissions,’ Wall said. “We have our (GHG) emissions reduction targets and continue to work toward them.”

Wall’s government’s plan is to reduce emissions to 20% below 2006 levels by 2020. Any climatologist could tell you this is totally insufficient to arrest climate change. The Kyoto protocol to reduce GHG to below 1990 levels, is arguably insufficient also, and there was a lot less carbon going into the atmosphere in 1990 than in 2006.

In fact, the destined-to-fail SaskParty plan is based on the equally political and unscientific Conservative [Not] Made In Canada (TM) lack-of-plan in Ottawa. That’s why all of the numbers are 20-20-20, they are a propaganda gimmick, not a scientific reality to “address the greenhouse gas issue”. They are ‘addressing it’ by reassuring the casual observer into a false sense of security, to trick people into thinking their leaders have the problem under control when in fact it’s totally mismanaged.

If you Do The Math, you’d want serious action from our government.

Do The Math – English subtitles from 350.org on Vimeo.

Continue reading

Peak Oil Is Not Coming…

It’s here. This IEA report spells out peak oil as being in the past.
“Days of cheap energy over, IEA figures show”

The IEA’s annual outlook on investment, released today, shows annual investment in new fuel and electricity supply has more than doubled in real terms since 2000. Costs to the oil and gas industry also have doubled in that period and the IEA warns of “gradual depletion of the most accessible reserves.”

Canada is already seeing projects cancelled because of the high costs of developing the oilsands. And its contradictory stance on climate change with rules for the oil and gas industry repeatedly delayed may contribute to future uncertainty.

There would be no “gradual depletion” if we were in the non-peaked early 20th century.

The added expense of energy has a silver lining in that it will convince affluent North Americans to consider lower energy means of living. This could reduce pollution causing lung disease and climate change.

Solar Power for all Saskatchewan households

A recent poll has shown that nuclear power doesn’t have majority support in Saskatchewan, and I think that’s fine. My own family has mixed attitudes toward it. My parents, who own 17 solar panels, wouldn’t mind seeing nuclear power in Saskatchewan, while I oppose the waste-producing nuclear technology available today.

A 2010 study by the CCPA shows “nuclear power has the potential to triple current electricity rates for Saskatchewan consumers.” If we’re going to pay more than we do for Estevan’s coal and Manitoba’s hydro, I want us to invest in solar power.

The massive Ivanpah solar power facility that opened this year for California consumers should be considered as an option for sunny and vast Saskatchewan. Smaller solar plants such as this type could be constructed with mostly Saskatchewan and Canadian materials, knowledge, and labour. Built at the 3 year pace set by California, we could jump to having solar power overtake some fossil fuels as our electricity provider, before 2020.

Given that there are about 410,000 households in Saskatchewan, we’d need about 3 Ivanpah style solar power plants to provide electricity to every home in the province. We can do it, and we should.