I’m Boring, Ignore Me: Supreme Court Ruins Privacy

I think people who say they are too ordinary, law abiding, and boring for police to violate them, are more wishing that were true than stating a fact.

Will the police keep the phone as it keeps generating evidence? For how long? Can you refuse to provide your password or will the police IT department bypass it?

In Gary Shteyngart’s 2010 novelSuper Sad True Love Story of a terrible future, everyone walks around with an “apparati,” a data-collection rating device on their chest. It’s like wearing an open cellphone. This court ruling takes us one step closer to this.

And it is very easy to be arrested. It just happened to a friend’s teenage son, the victim of two 30-year-old men following him around filming him and harassing him. The boy, wrongly accused of aggression, was strip-searched. He’s too young to have any secrets on his cell, but I thought he was too gentle a kid to be arrested in the first place. I was wrong.

He was vulnerable to lazily vicious cops. You think it cannot happen to you. Maybe it will.

Police Violence Rages in Ferguson, MO

The out-of-control police response to protests against the killing of Michael Brown in a St. Louis, MO suburb, continues.

Yesterday more journalists were arrested without charge, leaving little evidence for the wronged reporters to seek damages in a civil lawsuit.

This police riot in Ferguson is more evidence that Obama is hostile toward the free press (which includes Julian Assange trapped in London).

The police are blaming the media and the public for what’s going wrong. The blame begins and ends with their behaviour. Their member killed an unarmed kid. They refused to charge the culprit. They’ve fired teargas at children and peaceful demonstrators. They’ve arrested media. None of these things are reasonable in the United States considering the First Amendment.

The police said that anyone other than people carrying $50K cameras will be arrested tonight. That’s an illegal threat in the US of A.

It’s time for a lot of resignations.


The killing was live-tweeted

The Ballad of #MikeBrown

If you go to Quik Trip
You’d better take your gun,
Cause the boys in blue will get you,
That’s how things are done,
In #Ferguson.

If you finish highschool in this two-bit town,
A quick trip may last forever if they gun you down,
The fate of poor #MikeBrown.

Those darn pedestrians are a threat, don’t you know?

ConCalls: Canadian Election Attacked From America #RoboCon

If Canada’s “SIGINT” (Signals Intelligence) agency doesn’t have records to share with Elections Canada of malicious #robocalls made outside of Canada aimed at disrupting our federal election, then what good is CSEC doing for our democracy? Tracking Brazilian terrorists?

Production orders were obtained for records from Rogers, Shaw and Videotron. Together, they provided records of 6,051 incoming calls received by the 129 complainants named in the production orders. Investigators determined that these calls originated from 1,597 different numbers. Each number was matched to a subscriber where possible. Some service providers gave subscriber information, but others refused to confirm subscribers without a production order. Some numbers originated with US service providers, all of whom similarly refused to co-operate. In the end, subscriber information for incoming calls was obtained for 949 numbers and could not be obtained for 648 numbers. Each number was also checked against political telemarketers’ call log data, numbers known to have been used by political entities, and the CRTC and Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre databases of suspect numbers.

We know thanks to Ed Snowden that the NSA (and therefore CSEC) keep “metadata” on the phone calls made.

The inability [of Elections Canada] to access the call records of the 213 additional complainants for whom call records existed, but whose complaints came too late to be included in the initial ITOs, meant that some complainant reports could not be checked against concrete telephone records. This made reliance on the co-operation of political parties and telemarketers even more important.

Some telemarketers and telephone service providers refused outright to co-operate.

Could those include robocall providers contracted exclusively by the Conservative Party of Canada to conduct phoning for their political masters and friends?

Their intent was clear to even Elections Canada, who had its hands clamped over its ears during the entire investigation when they weren’t tied behind its back.

117. It is noteworthy, however, that the investigation found that some national and local campaigns had arranged for calls informing electors of their poll location despite, at least in the case of one party, their knowledge that a small percentage of electors would be given incorrect information, and despite Elections Canada’s warning to political parties not to give poll location information.

Recently the RCMP excused Nigel Wright from facing charges for bribing Mike Duffy because they said they couldn’t prove mens rea, his guilty mind (intent). With RoboCon, we have both the guilty mind confirmed, and the criminal act of misdirecting voters, and again no charges for Conservatives.

A disturbing pattern has emerged in Canada.

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Canadian Police and Suicide Hotlines Violating Privacy

It’s mind boggling that Canadian police would think it’s justified in sharing mental health information with Homeland Insecurity in order to help the USA discriminate against people with mental illness.

What in the heck made them think it’s okay? Are they crazy?

People need to trust that they can reach out to a Suicide Hotline without fear of future reprisals. Canadian police have seriously damaged this expectation, and therefore are likely to have harmed people who’d have otherwise sought help. It would be hard to learn definitively if this abuse of authority has killed people, because the people we’d learn that from will have silenced themselves permanently.

No word yet from the Regina and Saskatoon police forces if they violate privacy in this manner.