SaskPower Carbon Capture and Storage Goes Online Late, Over Budget

I must print a “correction” to my piece in April when I reported that the SaskPower CCS plant was on time and online.
The plant went online late last month, two seasons after it was scheduled, to deal with an apparently surprise asbestos attack.

While the final costs are still being calculated, Mr. Watson acknowledged the project is over budget. Last fall, that overage was pegged at $115-million, or 9 per cent.

“The project aims to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by one million tonnes annually, which amounts to about 90 per cent of the emissions from the plant.”
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Peak Oil Is Not Coming…

It’s here. This IEA report spells out peak oil as being in the past.
“Days of cheap energy over, IEA figures show”

The IEA’s annual outlook on investment, released today, shows annual investment in new fuel and electricity supply has more than doubled in real terms since 2000. Costs to the oil and gas industry also have doubled in that period and the IEA warns of “gradual depletion of the most accessible reserves.”

Canada is already seeing projects cancelled because of the high costs of developing the oilsands. And its contradictory stance on climate change with rules for the oil and gas industry repeatedly delayed may contribute to future uncertainty.

There would be no “gradual depletion” if we were in the non-peaked early 20th century.

The added expense of energy has a silver lining in that it will convince affluent North Americans to consider lower energy means of living. This could reduce pollution causing lung disease and climate change.

SaskPower Carbon Capture and Storage Going Online Today, On Schedule

“The government boasted at last week’s Boundary Dam symposium that the project will be up and running this fall and completed by next April, on time and on budget.”

Hey, today’s April Fool’s Day. Of course it’s not going online today, as planned last May September by politicians managing SaskPower.

Sask., Alta. to lead push for carbon capture; Energy, environment take centre stage at premiers meeting
Wood, James. Star – Phoenix [Saskatoon, Sask] 31 May 2008: A.6.

“The prospect of capturing and storing CO2 to allow for low-emission coal-fired electricity plants and oilsands developments is an alluring one. But much of the technology is yet unproven, the costs involved are massive and there must be a use for the captured carbon such as enhanced oil recovery.”

“(CEO Robert) Watson says SaskPower will be ready to start shipping CO2 to Cenovus by April 1, 2014.”


“Coal is not going away” – Brad Wall
Wall continues to conserve the Conservative way.

ADDED:
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The Blustery Winds of Stupidity Hit Weyburn Hard #skpoli

At least 2 Weyburn City Councillors were not duped by anti-Wind propaganda that afflicts many municipalities. There’s probably no bylaw against this family running a noisy, polluting diesel generator in their backyard, contributing to poor health of their neighbours. I’d have to reason that the neighbour(s) who complained about this windmill isn’t very bright.

The time frame given to Dustin and Vanessa Storle, owners of the turbine, was to have it removed by July 30. After this, there will be no more residential wind power in the windy city of Weyburn.

I hope they find a resident of a less backward Rural Municipality to install their turbine, and split the profits. It’ll probably work better unencumbered by surrounding buildings anyway, which can dampen the wind speed required for maximum output.

There’s probably some multi-century conspiracy from windmill owners to install these tornado generating devices all over the planet. I haven’t figured out the physics for how an energy receiving device is adding low frequency energy to air pressure, but maybe one of the crackpot geniuses in Weyburn can spell it out. They sure convinced the more gullible of their city council to fall for the hoax that wind power is unsuitable for homeowners.

Meanwhile, another municipality outside of Regina is on the verge of getting rich instead.

A public meeting will be held [Tuesday] east of Regina in McLean on a proposed wind farm in the area.

The RM of South Qu’Appelle is holding the meeting to determine if there is public support for the proposal.

So far, some landowners have expressed opposition to the project, citing concerns about vibration, impact on wildlife and livestock and other possible health problems.

The project would first require a test tower. The meeting starts at 7 pm Tuesday at the McLean Community Centre. The RM Council will decide whether to proceed with appropriate bylaws if there is sufficient support for the proposal.

The concern the oil and gas industry shows for “wildlife, livestock, and possible health problems” is world renowned. I can’t imagine how a greener alternative to oil, coal, and gas could possibly kill more.

UPDATE:
There’s no much “debate“, because the anti-Wind folks don’t have facts to back up their conjecture.

First Nations Get $0.3M for Solar Research #skpoli

The Conservative government generously gave First Nations in Saskatchewan enough grant money to build one impressively sized solar array that could power a half dozen homes.

Ontario is going with $5,000M.

SaskPower gave 10 times the recent federal contribution, to the UofR to research how to put CO2 underground so more oil can be pumped out of the Weyburn area.

Lockheed manufactures illegal weapons, and is part of the F-35 dud stealth bomber boondoggle.

Solar is not “concentrated” in SK as explained in the article, we just have more sun hitting the ground throughout the year than most of Canada. There’s no magnifying glass aimed at Regina or Estevan, fortunately.

$300K is better than a kick in the teeth, I suppose. It’s to be used on little demonstration projects. It’s 2013, and Germany has already done a country-wide demonstration project that we can wholesale adopt here in Saskatchewan. Let’s get on with it already.

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