Alberta P3 News #skpoli

Here’s some news hot out of Alberta. Only one of them is satirical.

The other satirical bit is that Saskatchewan’s Sask Party recently announced they’d be saving taxpayers millions of dollars by starting a P3 Bike Share like Stettler had. No wait, they said they were going to build P3 schools, after the Alberta model, to build schools faster.

T-Rex Doesn’t Taste Like Bacon

I couldn’t keep a straight face over this one. The T-Rex Burger is offensive, but the Baconator isn’t?

“She said the fast-food restaurant “strives to deliver a positive dining experience for our customers. Our goal is to provide options to our customers so they can make options that meet their needs.”

Reddit ruins the fun, unintentionally.

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Meanwhile, what could go wrong with having passengers’ phones designed to communicate via radio signals to a bag with radio communication emanating from it. That won’t freak airlines right out. (Kaboom) They shouldn’t be losing bags in the first place, since there’s a policy that bags do not go onto planes if the passenger hasn’t joined the flight their bag is on.

(dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2341600/The-luggage-GPS-tracking-device-makes-impossible-lost.html)

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I for one welcome our Flying Cyclist Overlords, and look forward to serving in their bicycle mines.

Bike Derangement Syndrome at Wall Street Journal

If you’re suffering from low blood pressure, I have the treatment:
WSJ hack interviews an editorial board nutcase Dorothy who says among other things:
“Look, I represent the majority of citizens.”

She’s “appalled” that bike sharing has happened in NYC.

“Best neighbourhoods are begrimed by these blazing blue CitiBank bikes.”

“It is shocking to walk around the city, to see how much of this they have sneaked under the radar, in the interest of the environment.”

“The most important danger in the city is not the yellow cabs, it is the bicyclists…”, opined Dorothy.
Nicole Gelinas wrote that for 4 years, said the WSJ hack, “no pedestrians have died underneath a bike in New York, but 597 have been hit [sic; “killed” said Gelinas] by cars and trucks.”

“The bike lobby is an all powerful enterprise,” without a hint of satire.

“New York is not London, or Paris,” says the interviewer hack. “Or Amsterdam!” pipes up Dorothy. Well actually…

bike distance

I hope I don’t ever get as crazy as poor Dorothy when I turn a million years old and become an orange dinosaur too.

Bikes, along with closing Times Square to cars, have “ungridlocked” New York. Dorothy sees bikes everywhere as the sign of a “totalitarian” regime. It’s unfortunate that she’s an editor of one of America’s largest newspapers, but helps explain why America has to struggle to pull itself out of the 20th century.


Hat tip to Sean Shaw

Cycling In Regina Isn’t Always Easy

What’s it like for a Regina cyclist to go see a movie?

Besides homicidal/comical drivers (from Alberta),
kills

there are flooded Multi Use Pathways,
Biking from the SW to the NE poses a few problems

and underpasses that are creeks.
Biking from the SW to the NE poses a few problems

Persist past those hazards, and there are gravelly “Shared” bike lanes with parked cars ready to give you the “door-prize”.
Biking from the SW to the NE poses a few problems

Can you see drivers being as patient and persistent as Regina’s cyclists? Despite the flooded dead-ends without detour signs, I made the 11km bike ride from the south west, to the north east in under an hour, so I could catch the latest “Star Trek Into Darkness” [10/10]. I’d highly recommend trying it. The film was great fun too. *rim shot*

Transportation: Where to go, and how to get there in #YQR


Most of my speech as heard in the video above, and posted to my Regina politics blog:

I’m very pleased to have been asked to speak at Campion College about transportation issues. I got my Computer Science – co-op degree from here a decade ago, and I never imagined at the time that I’d wind up the President of a different sort of “co-op”, the Regina Car Share Co-operative. At the time, I had no idea that “car sharing” was even a thing. I’d heard of car pooling of course, but they are different. It wasn’t until I returned to work at the UofR, that I got an email about a group of people holding a pot luck supper in Regina to discuss forming a “car share”, and I thought that sounded like maybe a good way to use a car without the unpleasantries of maintaining one. A few years later, I was chosen to help guide a remarkable group of volunteers who make organized car sharing possible in our city, as it is in almost every other major Canadian and American city today.

Why am I interested in transportation? Well, I’m interested in nearly everything, but where curiosity meets reality is on the streets. Nearly everyone in the world has a daily need to move about the farm, town, or city they live at, and so modes of transportation are essential to how and where we live. If transportation isn’t timely or fun, people don’t enjoy where they live as much as they should. I don’t think car repair is fun, and feel dealing with SGI is about the worst thing that could administratively happen to someone (short of being charged with a crime). So I’ve set out to make transportation both timely and fun for myself, and it just so happens that I need to make it that way for the people around me too, in order to be successful.

Another big reason I’m interested in transportation improvement, is that it’s a major contributor to air pollution and climate change. These are not small, or easy problems to solve, but our little daily actions collectively point our society in either the right or wrong direction. Right now, Regina is unquestionably pointed in the wrong direction, and among our collective actions pointing us there is how we get around every day. Since public talks are always more fun with interaction (I think so anyway, because otherwise I tend to get sleepy especially if the speaker has a mono-tone voice like mine,): How many people got to University today by themselves in a motor vehicle? How many car pooled? How many took the bus? How many biked or walked?
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